Thursday, March 22, 2012

Adria support for single EX-YU airline

Déjà vu?
Adria Airways CEO, Klemen Boštjančič, has announced that if Adria Airways’ pending privatisation process fails, a single airline for the former Yugoslavia will need to be created as no carrier in the region has the chance to survive in the current economic climate. “If the sale of Adria to a foreign partner fails, then our last chance is for regional integration with Croatia Airlines, Jat Airways and Montenegro Airlines”, Boštjančič told one of Slovenia’s most popular web portals - “SiOL”. The news comes a week after the Association of European Airlines urged Adria Airways to take a leading role in the integration of the former Yugoslav aviation market.

Adria’s CEO notes that Brussels has already shown support for the creation of a single airline for the former Yugoslavia. “Croatia will soon become an EU member and Serbia and Montenegro are not far off”, Boštjančič adds. However, Adria will first attempt to put itself on the market to foreign airlines. By the end of the month a financial consultant will be chosen to assist the Slovenian carrier with its privatisation process. While Boštjančič says that there is interest in Adria, he notes, “We and the government have to do everything in order for Adria Airways to get a new owner but I do not know whether we will succeed”, adding that regional cooperation must develop simultaneously with the privatisation process. Currently, many bigger players in Europe such as LOT Polish Airlines and Czech Airlines are awaiting privatisation.

Adria Airways already enjoys cooperation with airlines in the former Yugoslavia. It has code share agreements with both Jat Airways and Montenegro Airlines. Klemen Boštjančič says that regional integration could fail out of purely political reasons. All of the national EX-YU airlines ended 2011 with multi million euro losses. Once again the debate over a single national carrier for the countries of the former Yugoslavia reopens, 21 years after its break up.

48 comments:

  1. If the EU orders it they will do it in a hearbeat.

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  2. Although regional airline consolidation is surely needed, this statement is perhaps more like trying to show other options in front of potential strategic partners considering Adria's purchase (if any).

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  3. If Adria wants to merge with Jat,Montenegro Airlines, and BiH Airlines may they do so,just leave Croatia Airlines out of it. I wish Slovenia all the best..It seems as if Slovenia is about to enter a depression.

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  4. @Anonymous 01:31 AM
    Why? Croatia Airlines is financially so successful? Or is it about politics again?!

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  5. Croatia Airlines surely is the least interested for such a merger and would most likely never join it. Croatia is a country with a major tourism industry with more than 12 million tourists annually and growing. These numbers will soon reach 20 million plus...so why would Croatia Airlines give itself up for some regional airline. Slovenia is a small country without a major tourism industry..so i can see their interest. Serbia just wants to have access to modern jets, which they can't afford to buy. I am sure Croatia Airlines will not be stupid enough to contribute to the Serbs desire to have access to a modern fleet. When Yugoslavia fell apart the Serbs took every aircraft in the JAT fleet and now Croatia Airlines is supposed to have them use ours? lol

    This will never happen! Long live Croatia Airlines! The losses are getting smaller and it will be profitable again soon.

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    1. In addition, Croatian aviation industry makes almost 50% of ex-yu, so we could talk only about CA taking over all others, except JAT, which is proven without any value at all.

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    2. Goverment of Serbia was 100% owner of JAT, so like you said, Serbs, did not have any reason to take from you anything whic already was their property

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    3. I agree that OU has no interest whatsoever to join this project. Actually, I can't see how JU would benefit as well, as no other future hub has a fraction of BEG's potential and capacity. And partners surely don't have enough cash to modernize the fleet, remember, we are talking about 10-12 jets, not one or two regional jets.

      By the way, the planes Serbs "took" were bought on credit, which was serviced exclusively by Serbia, so it was kind of logical they get to keep them. The same way Zagal planes were left in Croatia, and Adria's in Slovenia. Don't let the name fool you, Jat was a company that operated (and had privileges) all over Yugoslavia, but it was a Serbian airline.

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  6. CTN won't be profitable as long it is in goverment hands. look at this country, just falling apart. what i am sure about is, that CTN won't join any regional alliance or reginal assotiation. reasons purely political, and not so far distant ugly yugoslavian brake up. yes we have tourism, but we can't live through whole year off just 2-3 months of tourism.

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  7. Croatia has built close to 1,000 miles of highway in the last 10 years and is still building them..if you think that is a country that is falling apart...you are crazy... I am sure your not aware of the $200 million contract in Iraq that a Croatian company recently received or the 170 million contract in Libya we received the other day...There have been many of the contracts being awarded to Croatian companies...Look at companies like Dok-ing, Rimac Automobili, Koncar, Pliva, Ina, Agrokor, Atlantic Grupa, Dalekovod, Brodosplit, Konstruktor Split, HS Produkt, Konstruktor Split, Viadukt, etc, etc....There are some good things happening in Croatia now..Look at the electric cars that Croatia will be producing...Have you seen the elctric trains Koncar is producing ?Look at the success of Agrokor, Atlantic grupa....Croatia isn't falling apart...far from it..Now that they are arresting the corrupted politicians, Croatia will attract far more foreign investments!

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    1. That is all good and well. The only problem is that the country is in recession and has one of the highest debt rates in Europe.

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    2. That is true...but Radimir Cacic is in charge and that guy means business.Croatia is heading in a new direction now. There is no need to backtrack in forming an exyu airline. I am sure that Lufthansa will one day purchase a stake in Croatia Airlines. This will happen before 2015 and the opening of the new Zagreb Terminal. There is no way the Croatian government will allow Serbs to use our fleet.You can take that to the bank :)

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    3. And yet somehow FDI numbers are not that good as in some other neighboring countries.

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  8. Local legacy carriers can hardly survive and be profitable without long haul product of their own because only on these routes there is some real cash and no LCC competition.

    With introduction of long haul traffic, regional traffic is also boosted.

    However, that endevour is way too risky for any of ex-YU airlines and needs higher passenger volumes that can be achieved through some kind of consolidation.

    This kind of consolidation can also mean something like keeping all the current airlines and jointly feeding and running long haul business.

    However, that is something that Star Alliance/LH would most probably never allow to happen, since it would decrease ex-YU feed to MUC, FRA, VIE, ZRH, etc.

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  9. The only way a 'joint' airline would have any chance and I stress chance would be if all the current airlines closed shop a new brand was created. This of course causes so many problems and issues that I wonder why anyone would bother, for example hub location, where will the head quarters be based, workforce ratio of nationalities involved and how it will be divided just to name a few how the profits would be split or who would be responsible for the losses.
    The airlines in their current form have a much better chance of survival so I say it’s a bad idea.
    And another problem, the unfortunate elephant in the room is that many people in the former Yugoslavia countries and the associated Diaspora will not look kindly on what they could see as another step towards recreating a Yugoslavia (paranoia of this nature exists) and the 'joint' airline may find itself boycotted by tens of thousands of passengers who would be happy to see it fail.
    In my opinion if Jat had their act together they could have made a move to set up an offshoot based in Skopje, I think they would have been positively received by the Macedonians if they were given a good route structure along with reasonable time table and prices.
    In my opinion, there is no chance of a union between Adria and Croatia due to Adria’s current financial state or at least until this improves. But a lot can be done here in the mean time for the benefit of both carriers in the field of maintenance and fleet sharing for example. This would be further advanced if Adria moves to replace its fleet of smaller CRJ 200s with OU compatible Q400s

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  10. Anonymous at 02:07:
    Croatia might have built miles of highways, but its under huge debt and they´re almost totally empty. I drove two days ago from Knin to Serbian border (via Zagreb) and the highways were completely empty, there were more trucks than cars. The Split-Zagreb stretch was specially empty. On Zagreb to Serbia all trucks and cars were either Serbian, Turkish or Bulgarian with few BIH - no Croatian. That is just ridiculous, i wonder why those roads were built and money spent, just for a poor country to look rich and now pay your debt and shut up with your infantile nationalism. Also saw the Zagreb airport on the way, it looked so small and empty as well.

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    1. You can create demand by investment, you know. Nobody used to take train between MAD and BCN - how everybody does, after bullet train has been introduced. But, had they taken a look at the figures prior to that investment, there was no reason at all to build the tracks in the first place...

      Oh, and why should it matter whose license plates cars have on Croatian motorways? Serbian car takes as much space as a Croatian car, and they both pay equal tolls to Croatian highways, right? They could all be Turks for that matter.

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    2. You are obviously from the poorest country in Europe i.e. Serbia

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  11. @Tupolev - I suppose when you crossed the Serbian border the traffic was tremendous?
    Anyway, it is the dead time of the year, after Easter season the highway towards Serbia is so crowded that one wishes to have 3 lanes because of so many trucks and cars. And who cares which license plates you see? They pay their tolls, don't they. And they pay them to Croatia not to the countries of their origins. Same thing goes for ZG-ST highway; it wasn't built for Croatians alone,it was built for transits and tourists so that Croatia can profit from people driving through its territory. Smart isn't it?
    Admit it, you do feel a pang of jealousy when you drive your little car on those highways, don't you?
    So, your snide remarks are illogical to say the least. And, no Croatia while indebted is not nearly one of the most indebted countries in Europe.

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  12. if you read this forum you know why balkan airlines are in deep truble. Eaven CroatiaAirlines!!!, and they still dont have any profit and they never will have one, like no airline in EXYU region, that's why it wuld be better if they would made one airline in this region. It wont happen, but it wuld be good. LH will never allow that to happen!!! Never. They need CA and AA to feed ther LH planes. And dont talk about Croatia like its the best coutry in the world. It isnt, it is far away from that. Some day mybe we will be best.... mybe

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  13. Ha ha, can you imagine this, pilot-Slovene, copilot-Croat,main FA-Montenegrin, one FA Serbian, one Macedonian and one Bosnian.i think the plane wouldn't even take off as the crew would start fighting even before the boardong would take place :D no i can't see this happen!it would start already with the language, in YU Slovens were forced to speak Serbocroat (luckily not anymore!), Croats demand they have their own language,etc...i simply can't see this happen (regardles how many kms of motorways croatia has and whou bulit them).

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  14. As for this bashing-of-croatian-highways, good infrastructure is a base for good economic development, everyone knows it. And I also think it is very wise, I can see that Croatia has developed tremendously over the last years only. Good job HR!
    As for a common EX-YU airline, it's a good thought, but you have to think of the cultural grounds. Before we had one state, Yugoslavia that was a common basis. But not anymore. Although many of us ex-yugos feel some kind of attachment to the others despite warfares and crap, many others still feel animosity towards eachother. I'm from Sweden (croat mother greek father) and I see what happens here with SAS, quarrels, envious comments when CPH gets longhaul and not ARN, different cultures (believe me even the scandies are different inbetween). So no, I don't think it's a good idea. HOWEVER, a deepened COOPERATION between the airlines, THAT'S another thing! I think that would benefit them all.

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  15. I actually agree with Tupolev and I am not from Serbia. I often drive from Slovenia to Bosnia via Zagreb and Slavonski Brod and he is right. No matter if it's winter or sumemr, the roads are relatively empty and when you have some cars, they are mostly with foreign plates. Once you enter Bosnia or Slovenia things change dramatically and you see much more traffic and "life". Also, when I landed in ZAG last summer, I decided to spent few hours in the city to see how it is. It was Thursday evening, mid of July and it looked very sleepy. I was shocked as I expected it to be crowded and very lively for that time of the year. The city though looks very clean and modern, just nothing happening. I have few friends from Croatia and they are very dissatisfied with the living conditions. Constructing all those roads and infrastructure has put the country in lots of debt. This might get even worse when the country joins the EU as the government subsidized/owned companies (such as Croatia Airlines) will stand no chance against the harsh competition from EU. Just look at what happened in Slovenia. Almost everything was sold to Germans and Italians. What's left is incompetent and small. Nothing is made in Slovenia anymore, people lost their jobs, the prices went up and nobody can afford anything. EU is a good thing for big countries such as Germany, France, UK, etc. The EU was a good as an economic union but not as a political one. If you think EU is something better than what ex YU was...good luck. The cooperation between the EX YU airlines shouldn't be driven by a political factor but mainly by an economic one. As long the politics keep interferring we will have no prosperity and progress in the region. Love and respect each. We can't change what happened in the past but we can dfinitely make the future better for us and our future generations.
    Cheers

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    1. dear Sam, I completely agree with the second part of your post, about economics which should prevail over politics and about the cooperation in ex-yu. But the first part, roads empty in Croatia and things change dramatically when you enter Bosnia and Slovenia, cm'on, are you joking, I mean you must be describing some other country, not the one I live in. And the part about Zagreb, it's empty in July, of course, what else did you expect- I mean all the people who were complaining to you of tough life in Croatia were somewhere on the coast spending their holidays. No hard feelings, but based on one or two visits, you can't generalize on how people live in one country even if that country is not the one you like the most in the world. Ciao!

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    2. @ pozdrav iz Rijeke;
      I love Croatia and I wish it the very best. My experience is not based on one visit. I have been there numerous times. Of course, there is improvement but Croatia is still lagging and is far away from its potential. Much of the coast is still undeveloped with many "Titoist Era" hotels and apartments that haven't seen any updates in decades. The prices go up so much during the summer season yet the service and offer is very mediocre compared to Portugal, Turkey and Greece where you can get much more for your money. You cannot hike the prices to the max during those 2-3 months, ripping tourists off and not do anything for the rest of the year. If you already want to live just of tourism, invent, build something that will bring tourists year around. What Croatia has to offer might be sufficient for the tourists from Ex Yu, but that's where the unrealized potential occurs. People from Serbia, Bosnia and even Slovenia feel like they are not welcome in Croatia at all and rather go somewhere else where they don't have to deal with stupid war politics and arrogance of how everything in Croatia is better than theirs. This mentality needs to be changed fast so everyone feels welcome. Those are the people who bring money. Maybe not that much as those from Western Europe, but if you want the tourists from the West and more money, you will also have to offer something more than some "Hotel More" and a beach chair for 15 EUR a day. I believe that a healthy economic competition between Croatia and Serbia can produce many benefits for the region. At the end they are still the biggest players in the area and only stable and wealthy Croatia and Serbia means prosperity and well-being for us in the neighborhood. If Croatia thinks it can do everything alone and ignoring its neighbours, it will not take the country too far. I am not suggesting any political union or anything, just work together and be nice to each other. As a country you can choose your friends, but you can't choose your neighbors.

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    3. @Sam, consider yourself lucky if you encountered empty roads! I travel often to Slavonia and most of the time there is just too much traffic on that particular highway. Once, after Easter I drove 80km/hr most of the way because of the traffic. So, either you were lucky or you are lying. Sorry to be so harsh, but I travelled that road too many times and it was never truly empty. Besides, it is an important European corridor, it is not just a Croatian highway.

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    4. @ Anonymous
      No reason to lie...the only heavier traffic I experience on my entire trip from Ljubljana to Sarajevo is on the border in Slavonski Brod, which can take literally hours to cross, especially during the holidays. Maybe I always choose the wrong time of the year :) Sorry, if I was misunderstood. When I say empty, it doesn't mean no cars at all. There are cars on the road but nothing compared to the traffic I experience for example in the US or some Western European countries, where you spend 1-2 hrs stuck in the traffic every day on your way to work.

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    5. I'm not here for "my is bigger" stuff but to discuss aviation matters, however I have to reply to you, and this one is going to be the last:

      When you say "undeveloped coast" with Titoist era hotels and apartments that haven't seen any updates in decades, do you mean Hilton, Radisson, Sheraton, Westin, Le Meridienne, Kempinski, (only 5 star chains listed) and plenty of others. Or by our poor product you mean dozens of marinas for superluxurious yachts on whole lenght of the coast, or exquisite and refined cuisine offered, especcially in Istria, or hundreds of little family-owned and runned hotels throughout Croatia, or maybie you ment spa and wellness offer which is now in almost one quarter of all hotels, or one- or more days excursions which start from practically every village on most luxurious buses, boats, or even light taxi planes for panoramic flights. And I can go like this on and on and on, but I'll not and I'll say just few more things : just take look in any british or american or french or spanish magazine, you'll find an article which is describing Croatia as heaven on the Earth, with very good, or at least decent tourist offer. The best proof that I am right and you wrong are celebrities, mostly from Hollywood who regularly visit Croatia, let me name just Jollie&Pitt, Clooney, Travolta, and plenty of others, billionairs like Abramovitch and royalties-British,Norwegian and so on and so on. Yes, my friend, they are all coming to Croatia because of our mediocre offer, our balkanian-style rudeness, and sewage that drains into the beaches where they swim. For one thing, you are right, Croatia's torism is not not perfect, as no one other's is. And yes, we can do more. And we will do it. Don't worry.

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    6. Well said Pozdrav iz Rijeke,

      The only issue I have with Croatian development during in recent years is the cautious or even suspicious attitude towards foreign investment. Many opportunities have been missed here and Croatia could have been one of the few counties not experiencing a recession at this time if Croatia realised her full potential in this field.

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    7. Simply, you are just jealous. Of course, everything is empty particularly due to 11 Million tourists, who are obviously invisible.
      I believe that you are in panic knowing that Croatia is going to develop lot more than your homeland or your present home country.
      It is interesting that most of posts are dealing with situation in Croatia. Reason is simple. That is only ex-yu country that will make significant improvement in next years.

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  16. At least 3 statements given by one of ex-yu aviation's so-called EXPERTS, Bostjancic, need to be commented:

    1. "Brussels has already shown support for the creation of a single airline for the former Yugoslavia".

    If really so, I would like to know since when is Brussels(EU) interfering market economy by political decisions, especially in transnational matters? It's quite opposite to basic principles of EU functioning.

    2. "Croatia will soon become an EU member and Serbia and Montenegro are not far off"

    Here, for the part concerning Croatia I can agree, but the part related to Montenegro, and especially Serbia is total nonsense. It will take at least 10 years, probably longer, for these countries membership, and if that is not far off then the expert mentioned really has a problem with the perception of time (and maybie even space).

    3. "No carrier in the region has the chance to survive in the current economic climate".

    No, sir. Yes, it's crisis, yes, it's recession, yes, fuel is expensive, yes, taxes are high, but the word which is wrong in your statement is "economic". It should be "POLITICAL" climate instead, because if you personally, and your colleages from all of ex-yu airlines functioned without interference of politics, there would be nothing wrong now with the economic climate, and one bigger joint company would have probably already been created, based on economical principles. And instead doing so, you are all in politics again following your bosses orders.

    Based on all of these statements, I can conclude that this guy and AEA chief play for the same team whose two-letter code is LH.

    In coming years, southeastern Europe will be developing rapidly, maybie even booming, consequence of which will be drastical increase in passenger and cargo traffic volume. In order to keep their position in Slovenia and Croatia and completely take the rest of SE Europe, instead of more feeders which are more expensive and more difficult to control, they propose single feeder in order to STOP any attempt to develop civil aviation in ex-yu.

    And I really don't know for the other countries and airlines, but I hope that at least Croatia will not fall once again for this "west balkans (aviation)" story, but manage to privatize and restructure it's airline and civil aviation in general instead, become the hub for the region, and take back at least on part of traffic till now stolen by LH.

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  17. Somebody here mentioned that Slovenes are
    "luckily no more" forced to learn Serbocroatian...

    My mother who is Slovenian "had to learn" Serbocroatian which is wonderful because she can speak with people in Ex Yu in their language whoever they are even the Albanians and some Turks from Macedonia!

    Not to forget that her best friends are Croats...
    she also gets along with the Serbs!

    Learning a foreign language is always positive
    and Serbocroatian language is still of importance
    if you like it or not!

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    1. Exactly, and also its worth mentioning that there is around 10 million serbs and 8 million croats in the world. There is around 6 million bosnians....

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    2. i agree with you that learning a foregin language is a good and positive thing!and here in Slovenia it's quite common to speak at least one (if not more) foregin language(s),and at this point i'm not referring to serbocr.what i was trying to say is that it is good that now we can choose which language(s) we want to study, and considering that knowledge of serbocr. among younger generation is decreasing significantly shows what does that generation think of the importance of serbocr.Now, of course, number of native speakers has a strong impact, but it's not the only thing..

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    3. @ last Anonymous

      "considering that knowledge of serbocr. among younger generation is decreasing significantly shows what does that generation think of the importance of serbocr"

      Just because younger Slovenians don't take Serbo-Croatian language in schools any longer, it doesn't mean they don't speak or understand it. On the countrary, many young Slovenians are much more interested in Ex Yu culture, music, shows than ever before. Due to similarities between the two languages, it is very easy to undesrtand each other. Young Swedes and Norwegians also rather take English or German in schools than Danish but still understand each other very well.

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  18. Ex Yu has the best looking people. Just look at those flight attendants from OU/JP and JU.

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  19. Why does there have to be a hub? Southwest Airlines is successful in the US and it does not use this philosophy.

    This could work if it was actually run like a business and not as an arm of a political party.

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    1. It does have to be a hub because relatively rich market of 250 million and relatively poor market of less than 25 million cannot be compared. You can fill your planes in 10 or 20 major airports; here, it has to be one. Or we can continue with 4 or 5, controlled by LH, and continue to work for peanuts, unlike them.

      And it's exactly what this "proposal" is about.

      The second part is exactly what I'm proposing: not to merge bad airlines (mis)managed by people with old-fashioned communist state of mind because of political "advise"(read:order) from Brussels, or wherever, but to try to change conditions in currently biggest ex-yu aviation market, and offer good and cheap product to the whole ex-yu region.

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  20. Adria now even considering to merge with other airlines from Ex Yu...

    Obviously Adria is no more in denial
    of their illness which will result in death in near future...

    reminds me about dying people who before death want to reunite with people they no more talked to
    for decades.

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  21. Yeah croatia airlines will steal LH's traffic from ex Yu and Germans will sit and watch. Dude get real! They will flood the market with unrealistic prices and good night. Why would you take they pax anyways, aren't you in star with them.? I guess the new decade is here and you need a new/fresh propaganda material to beat on a boosh as you have done for the last two decades........

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  22. EU wants to create a single airline in ex-yu, probably because it is the easiest way to close one airline (like Malev), and to make space for western companies to make money.

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  23. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  24. Reading the entries in this particular story and on the Ex-Yu aviation blog in general I can see how much sense the Ex-Yu made from an aviation and transportatin point of view. One airline to rule them all (lord of the rings analogy may be bad) is logical and the only one that makes economic sense. By splitting Ex-Yu and effectively grownding JAT, the Western European countries fragmented a working economic model (how well it worked is another matter) and will in due time buy or rule all the smaller airlines that sprung in the region. It is true that LH will conquer the air space, especially in Slovenia and Croatia and beyond if Turkish Airlines allows it but does it make sense to have a single Ex-Yu airline with short and long haul service, no doubt about that at all.

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  25. I see so many croats rejecting this idea. No problem, they seem much more happy for OU under LH slavery wasting some 50 million € taxpayers money....instead of really growing into new markets, it seems for them better playing LH poodle and hoovering passengers to FRA and MUC.

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  26. The Croats boycott this idea?!

    They do Serbs a favour..its time for Serbs to do their homework instead of whining!

    Belgrade and Serbia have the biggest potential for a successful domestic airline...

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  27. The truth is, i stayed at Le Meridien LAV, in Split - Croatia's top 5 star hotel. Even though the facilities were decent, the staff's attitude was abysmal - rudeness and primitiveness. The facts went even worse cause when talking between each other they thought i didn't understand what they were saying in Croatian - of course i did, tough luck, it was reported to Starwood customer support. Every second word was a swear or an inappropriate remark on the guests. Unacceptable, i haven't seen this even in Third World Countries.

    With no offence, i have to share with you the fact that the person travelling with me, who was from South America told me that "The Croats seem to be very complexed as a nation and that they are trying in everything to be like Germans, getting an artificial identity"... Croatia's lacks in level of civilization are hard to overestimate and no infrastructural development can help in hiding that. When we went to Zagreb, she couldn't believe the Trg Bana Jelacica was not just the main city square but a square at all... ROFL. Those are comments from someone the least involved in ex-Yu stories. And we can hear similar remarks from all foreigners coming to Belgrade after Zagreb. " Is sleepy, expensive and there isn't much to do" being the typical comment.

    Concerning your cherished highways, yes, empty they are and that's a fact. And i did pay your tolls but i guess i did offset that money loss by travelling through HR at 190km/h with my "lil' car", i guess i owe your police/government much more than i did pay your tolls. :)

    No jealousy in here - i've been to many countries and let's not lie ourselves that Croatian highways are substandard. And the reason why there is no HR plates on your roads is cause the Croatian people don't have the money to pay those tolls and fuel, yet we do :) Those are the results of your economical situation where building more than you can swallow led you to. That's what we call having the eyes bigger than the stomach (or wallet).

    Yes, most of posts here are about Croatia - mostly about the demise of Croatia Airlines and the ever declining pax at ZAG.
    http://blog.linked2balkan.com/business/zagreb-numbers-continue-to-decline-weaker-february-at-zagreb-airport

    Finally, you have no clue what my home country is, Serbs are not the only ones who dislike you. Just as a hint i might say that just one of our main airports, which is in Eastern Europe, has more passengers than Croatia's population multiplied by 4...

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    1. Ref. Tupolev.
      You are full of hate, not just jealousy, towards anything Croatian. At least you have openly admit it, "Serbs are not only ones who dislike you". So, to expect any objectivity from such person is waste of time. It is pathetic how hard you are trying to picture Croatia and Croatians, as negatively as, possible and the strongest argument is opinion of your foreigners, you are obviously want to please, by any means. We have our lives not to please foreigners and eagerly beg for their attention, as you do. If you like us, come and be welcome to Croatia. If you do not like us, nothing simpler, just do not come, go around it, do not even cross it and you will feel better.

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  28. Nije mi jasno sta sada hoce Slovenci kad ni u ono vrijeme nisu mogli gledati samo jednu (JAT) kompaniju nego su morali napraviti svoju (Inex Adria) Vjerovatno bi oni trazili najvecu eksploataciju svojih aviona i potencijala ukoliko bi se oybiljno raymatralo o ovome. Nisu mi jasni nikako. Malo im trziste SLO a sada i KOS ?!?

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