Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Wizz Air gives up on Banja Luka

Wizz Air to skip Banja Luka

Despite attempts to launch flights from Banja Luka, the low cost airline Wizz Air has given up on its quest after it failed to reach an agreement with the airport. The Minister for Transport of the Entity of Republika Srpska, Nedeljko Čubrilović, said, “Unfortunately we were unable to agree to the terms set by the airline. It’s not as it looks. They aren’t coming here to give us anything, they want to come here to take something”. Mr. Čubrilović added Wizz Air requested subsidies for handling as well as for possible losses the low cost airline could incur on its services from Bosnia and Herzegovina’s second largest city.

Wizz Air and Banja Luka Airport have been in talks over possible flights for the past six months. Wizz initially offered Banja Luka Airport flights from Luton, Malmo, Eindhoven and Dortmund to choose from, with the airport selecting the service from Sweden as it considered it to be the most viable option out of the offered destinations. However, problems soon surfaced over fuel prices at the airport. “During the talks they were very difficult over handling prices so we would not benefit from them in any single way”, the Minister for Transport concluded. Banja Luka Airport has faced closure over the past several years and has struggled to attract customers. It is served by B&H Airlines which operates flights to Zurich while Air Serbia will launch flights to the city from Belgrade this winter.

Wizz Air inaugurated flights from Bosnia this summer with services to Tuzla. It has recorded solid results on its flights from the city. However, Mr. Čubrilović says Tuzla is providing large subsides to the low cost airline in order for it to maintain services to the city. Wizz Air has not commented on its talks with Banja Luka Airport. It is still considering launching flights to the Bosnian capital this year.

67 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I agree with Banja Luka airport management, Wizz Air wants to have free cake and eat it, in return for what exactly?

      They were kicked from Zagreb airport as they thought they can blackmail Zagreb airport over very same issue, to which Zagreb airport politely replied, no thanx, and EasyJet was more than happy to fill in.

      WizzAir along with the Ryan Air are worst low cost airlines, pure greed and I'd rather not have them if it was up to me.

      Sure Ryan Air flies to Zadar and is responsible for a fifth of Zadar' airport traffic figure but they're the only ones who are receiving subsidies from Zadar Airport, totally unfair if you ask me, even Croatian airlines must pay full market prices despite being domestic carrier.

      EasyJet, German Wings, Norwegian Air Shuttle and Vuleing have all proven you can be a low cost carrier and still provide good service.

      Delete
    2. Yes but I am sure that Wizz Air can make Zagreb work without any special treatment, the same way they are managing it in Belgrade.

      Delete
    3. @AnonymousAugust 14, 2013 at 3:02 PM

      They couldn't as Croats started to boycott them en-mass. Wizz Air service is so bad that most Croats wouldn't fly with them if you paid them. WizzAir lost luggage problems is legendary, almost every day they had issues where Passenger will be in Zagreb and his/hers luggage still at Luton airport, and a nightmare of waiting for your luggage to get back and than nightmare if your luggage has gone missing along with that $1500 laptop and $800 digital camera you had.

      Wizzair would never compensate customers for lost luggage and blame customers for Wizzair loosing customers baggage in the first place, and use old tested technique, Wizzair can't take responsibility for individual luggage if it gets lost, they'll sell you over the top insurance to ensure you do not lose your luggage, or Wizzair doesn't loose your luggage.


      Nightmares I heard from friends that flew with WizzAir, I just wonder how that company is still allowed to fly.


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    4. Thanks for the info.
      Yes, but it has been years since they left Zagreb, all of those problems have been solved since then. I am sure they would be far more successful now.
      Did they operate into Luton and Dortmund back then?
      What years did they serve Zagreb?

      Delete
    5. I didn't experience any of those problems, but I only flew once with them(I don't like low-cost airlines), and I don't have problem with their service. I do think that price for luggage is too big... I paid 21€ for Belgrade - London and 50€ for two peaces of luggage. Where is the logic in that...

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    6. @AnonymousAugust 14, 2013 at 5:56 PM

      Hope so, I have no idea what kind of service they've got now, flew once with EasyJet from Zagreb to London Luton and than took train to Euston or St Pancras station (forgot now which one) and my m8s place in Hampstead Heath where he lives, and than return flgiht back home to Zagreb service was standard low cost, had no luggage to speak off, only my backpack with change of socks, underwear and few shirts and one pair of jeans, all in all about 5-6kg and yes my passport, digital camera and few personal bits.

      If I flew with Wizz air they'd demand I put that in aircraft luggage hold and charge me 20 pounds for the pleasure.

      I really can't stand Wizzair.

      And yes they flew to Dortmund and London Luton, they also tried for Paris and Koln/Bonn airport and was ig Göteborg, they wanted to have some sort og hub at Zagreb airport, but i am so glad these plans were dropped.

      Wizz air pulled out of Zagreb at the end of 2009 I think, but as soon as they did, EasyJet got in and they are 10 time better than Wizz air.

      Although I prefer to travel with Croatian Airlines now, last time I flew on Croatian Air, cause my seat was next to a pregnant lady who needed bit more space (needed 2 seats) OU staff apologized to me and gave me a business class seat, and airplane was almost full, well only 3 seats free and all in business class.

      Another time i flew with them to Amsterdam and stewardess recognized me from previous flight and gave me an extra (small 250ml) bottle of vine as a parting gift.

      Nice touch from Croatian Air.



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    7. Nice story at the end.
      Have a similar one with a free drink on an OS flight from SKP to VIE.
      The stewardess forgot our row for the drinks and as I asked her why we didnt get any (drinks), she was totally shocked that she has forgotten us and gave everybody in the row complementary sparkling wine :) (also 250ml)

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    8. So Darko Marjanovic, once you're forced to fly with wizzair from London to Belgrade, experiencing not any of mentioned problems though, except price for luggage was enormous in your opinion; additional 50EUR for just two bags. When flying from Belgrade to London you had paid 21EUR for the same luggage.
      Would you let us know how much did the tickets cost in each of the cases?
      Thanks

      Delete
  2. With daily flights to be operated by Air Serbia, it's not like they are desperate to get Wizz Air.

    I wonder how much money Tuzla is giving to Wizz Air. It also makes me wonder if all these flights will remain once the subsidies are gone. Wizz Air will be forced to increase its fares in order to reduce its losses, making the airport less competitive when faced with Belgrade or even Zagreb.

    I would not be too optimistic about their Sarajevo negotiations either. Tuzla is a different case as they were desperate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The question there is; How much is Belgrade paying Wizz?

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    2. Nothing. They are paying them nothing.
      When the negotiations began, the airport authorities made it clear that they are not willing to give out any subsidies.
      Wizz Air did not even get any special discounts. Actually, the airport authorities expected Wizz Air to use all of the amenities offered. They were shocked when they saw that the airline will not use jet-bridges. They have also said that when it comes to profit, Wizz Air is not a great contributor.

      The only reason why Wizz Air got into the Serbian market with such ease was because of the Democratic Party. If we did not have elections last year, the party would have allowed Jat to die while the market would have been handed over to Wizz Air.
      Thank God the government changed and Jat lived to see another day.

      I think there is a market for Wizz Air in Belgrade, hence why they are sticking around.

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    3. You have to be kidding regarding Wizz Air in Belgrade. Wizz currently has the lowest costs for operating at BEG - they pay less than JAT (not taking into the account that JAT does not really pay its bills to the airport).

      Delete
    4. Jat is a special case because they are paying prices which were made especially for them. They were incomparably higher when compared to what the others are paying. When I referred to the rest, I meant other airlines serving Belgrade. I should have been more precise.
      Anyway, all airlines negotiate what they pay at BEG. So trust me, even airlines such as Lufthansa, Aeroflot and Austrian Airlines get special prices, the same way Wizz Air does.
      The whole point is that Wizz Air does not get preferential treatment in Belgrade.

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    5. @nemjee

      Tuzla airport is desperated and BNX is not?!!!

      LOL!

      Delete
  3. BNX should be closed as soon as possible or converted in sport airfield.
    This isn't an international airport,but only a good joke.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The same can be said for Tuzla then which can only sustain direct flights if it pays for them.

      Delete
    2. "BNX should be closed as soon as possible or converted in sport airfield.
      This isn't an international airport,but only a good joke."

      Not good, but bad joke!

      Delete
  4. I agree with Nedeljko Čubrilović!

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  5. The subsidies are not something new in this world! Of course that BEG does not need to give them subsidy due to its market capacity but if Morava Kraljevo decides to start with the flights, it would for sure, since there is no traffic at all today (why? different low market potential and willingness to pay etc.). The passengers are flying either to capitals, important and wealthy industrial cities or touristic destinations. Banja Luka, Tuzla nor Kraljevo do not belong to these cities. Low direct market potential! By side effects of air transport for local communities are big - cash flow, parking at the airport, taxi sevices, bus shuttles, hotels, restorants, shops all of them easily might be countable to VAT contribution (Budget back). The country would not have immediate profit, the airport will have income and should try to work more efficient with forecasted profit and the airline may have some profit (but not always sure they do). The BNX is subsided by RS Government by 750000 EUR this year already. What for if it is not for the benefit of the RS citizens traveling or their families or the netter income thos related to mentioned services? But there is no such traffic for these categories (except BNX-ZUR-BNX)! They were paying huge subsidies for flights to Salzburg?!(Austrojet) and Ljubljana??!! (via Sky Srpska to Adria) just beacuse there were "positive feedback" to some pockets - corruption - BH State Investigation Police Administration (SIPA) has already started the investigation in these cases, hopefully it will be closed properly.
    These out of mind comments and explanations given by minister and managing director just showed how they are resonsible to the citizens whose money they've been spending last 10 years at the BNX insisting at this inappropriate and unefficient business model rarely seen in the world... Sorry, there is no really economicaly reasonable background for such conclusions and decisions in case of BNX!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Screw Kraljevo! If any city should get flights it should be INI.

      Delete
    2. You are so wrong! Morava airport should be given priority over INI simply for reason that at least twice more people gravitates around the same and it is ideally positioned in between few major Serbian cities(Kragujevac,Cacak,Kraljevo,Krusevac,Uzice,Novi Pazar etc)also around that area is Kopaonik,Zlatibor and so many spas, so tourism does play big part for such decision as well.

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    3. Plus, isn't Nis kind of super close from Sofia? I doubt any Serb would travel from Pristina which is not that far from Kraljevo.

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    4. Why should people travel 100km to the airport, when LYNI is 4km from city downtown. It is closest airport for like 1.000.000 people... 300.000 ppl live in the city alone.

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    5. Yes but the economic situation in the region is catastrophic so it's not like people can afford to travel that often.
      Look at Montenegro Airlines, even if they get subsidies they still can't make it work.

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    6. Montenegro destination is a joke. Economic situation is not that good but it is not worse in than Kraljevo. Don't get me wrong I would love for Kraljevo to get flights(especially the winter ones), but I think people in Niš deserve those flights more. Only thing is that city would have to pay for airlines to fly more money than Tuzla... It is just sad that national airline doesn't care for those airports. I hope when the fleet is expanded they will base one or two airplanes in Niš and at least one in Kraljevo.

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    7. Air Serbia could launch Belgrade-Kraljevo via Nis flights. It should be fine if they use their Atrs.

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    8. I would love for that to happen, but I think we both now that is just unreal. Croatia Airlines would lunch flights before Air Serbia would... For those flights to be full it would be ideal for tickets of the prices be less than 30-38€... If low-cost can fly across Europe for 20€, why couldn't Air Serbia fly for amount of money like that. And amount of daily passenger between those 3 cities is very big.

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    9. You could make INI or Kraljevo (no official IATA code yet) feasible only with ATR or EMB120. At least in the beginning. Even then, you may need some subsidy (handling for sure), but definitely not as much as for Montenegro, which operates old 100 seat jet.

      Does anyone know the subsidy amount and the loads on INI flights to Podgorica ?

      In this day and age, nobody should (or will,as in case of investors) travel 200km (~3hr drive) to the nearest airport.

      my2cents

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    10. just found the answer to my own question. Average load factor in the period 17/07/12-31/01/13 was 37 (on a 102 seat plane). Nis is 'being taken to the cleaners'.

      I loved the title 'Traži se avio-prevoznik do Podgorice'. Speaking about rigged tender. Smacks of corruption. How many airlines will fly to Podgorica? :-)


      http://jugmedia.info/2013/03/29/trazi-se-avio-prevoznik-podgorice/

      my2cents

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    11. Guys, BNX gets its chance once in a 4 months to be put into focus and you sprinkle your diarrhea on it bouncing off one to another about Kraljevo, BEG, INI, podgorica etc. And what is worse, there's another topic about BEG besides. I wonder what idiots you are.

      Delete
  6. So how big are subsidies from TZL to wizz? In €, please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A lot, I'd say at least €600 000 per year or €2000 per flight + free handling and discount on fuel, in all could be as much as €1.0 million per year for 200 flights per year or around €5000 per each flight.

      Delete
    2. My guess is €1,000,000 per route, per year. Plus no handling fees while the airport would cover a part of the fuel costs. The last part was what they asked of BNX.

      Delete
  7. Is SJJ the only ex-YU airport to receive a SCHEDULED normally bookable flight operated by a wide-body?
    I am referring to Kuwait's flight.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Belgrade airport would need to finish 2013 with passenger growth of about 8% to 9% to have a chance of entering the list of 100 busiest European airports.
    Currently this is the list:

    95. Koltsovo Airport, Yekaterinburg: 3,783,000
    96. Bari Airport, Bari: 3,780,000
    97. Adana Airport, Adana: 3,777,000
    98. Los Rodeos Airport, Tenerife: 3,717,000
    99. Malta International Airport, Malta: 3,649,000
    100. Nantes Atlantique Airport, Nantes: 3,631,000

    Belgrade airport: 3,363,000
    Zagreb: 2,342,309

    I listed these two ex-YU airports as they are the only ones with a real chance of ever reaching top 100. Though looking at various airports located in touristy places it makes me wonder if Dubrovnik might reach it first- before Zagreb that is.

    All the above listed numbers are for 2012.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did some projections for all 3 major airports in Croatia, and only Zagreb will possibly enter list of top 100 European airports,

      2020 figure

      Zagreb airport: 5 124 000
      Split airport: 2 565 000
      Dubrovnik airport: 2 425 000

      I think by 2020, to secure position in top 100 airports, airport would need to have a bare minimum of 4.5 million pax, so Zagreb airport might just make it.

      Delete
    2. Croatians number will grow, but you have to consider that every other airport will grow. I dont think Zagreb will ever be in top 100. Split has better chances than Zagreb.

      Delete
    3. But wait, isn't it more logical for Dubrovnik to become the leading airport in Croatia because it is a tourist hot spot? I mean, Zagreb will grow but Dubrovnik should be listed with airports such as Rhodes, Heraklion, Larnaca, Lanzarote, Faro and other tourist airports which are in top 100.
      Logically speaking and when compared to other similar European airports, Dubrovnik is not served to its full potential. Normally, Dubrovnik should handled 5 million passengers.
      Or am I missing something?

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    4. You are missing something...! 5-6 flights per hour. Dobrovnik can't handle that.

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    5. They can't handle it now but if there is more investment I am sure this should not be a problem. Also, as tourist number grow, the airlines will send larger capacity aircraft there. As is the case with many other Mediterranean airports.
      It's a good start that they got a new terminal. But I think future growth is at the coast, not Zagreb.

      Delete
    6. Most airprts along the Croatian coast aren't that busy during 5-6 months of the year, around 150-200k per airport in terms for pax, it gets really busy between May and October, with passenger traffic above 200k recorded only in June, July and August. Zagreb airport on the other hand has traffic exceeding 150 for much of the year, with only 3 months with less than 150k, Jan, Feb and Nov.

      during May-October Zagreb is just as busy as other airports along the coast with 200-250k traffic, just that much of Zagreb's traffic during summer is due to foreign carriers, as Croatian Airlines is busy along the coast, swamped is a better word, and can barely cope.

      Zagreb airport during summer barely has 7-8 OU flights per day, Split for illustration gets about 20-22 OU flights per day, Dubrovnik around 17-20, Pula 5-6, Zadar 4-5, and even Osijke gets 1-2 flights per day.

      Demand for Zagreb is a lot bigger than Split or Dubrovnik, just that national airline can't cope with the demand and as a result Zagreb kind of stagnates during summers.

      BA, Lufthansa, Iberia, EasyJet, Austrian should really take over Zagreb airport in all honesty, hopefully from October all airlines introduce extra flights to Zagreb, seeing how Zagreb is becoming very popular city brake destination.

      Also current airport management did a poor job at ensuring smooth operation at Zagreb airport, they've messed it up big time, instead of asking BA, Lufthansa and other foreign carriers to increase number of flights due to Croatian Airlines shortcomings they just took it easy cause soon most of them will be out of work.

      Its a rotten mentality if you ask, if its not in their interests they won't budge.

      So glad that Paris Airport took over Zagreb, they'll bring order and make things run much smoother than current bunch of primadonas.

      Reason why i am so optimistic about Zagreb airport is what I see, the number of carriers recording really great load factors on all their flights to Zagreb, just yesterday Zagreb had 4478 passengers arriving on 78 flights, and half of them were small Dash8400Qs, the average now is 127 pax per aircraft operation, this is extremely good result, anything over 120 is extremely good, consider the fact that Hwathrow has 156 pax per aircraft operation.










      Delete
    7. I would like to add that Larnaca airport handles over 1 million passengers every August. I am sure that if Croatia keeps on developing its coast and if tourist numbers keep on rising, the same numbers could be achieved.
      Airports such as Rhodes or Heraklion are also rather quiet during winter time. When summer comes they are busy all the time hence why they manage to handle all those passengers. For example, the last time I was in Larnaca (three weeks ago) there were 7 Transaero birds there; 2 B737-800, 2 B777 and 3 B747s.

      Also, don't you think that if there was really that much extra demand for Zagreb in summer that airlines would react themselves and increase capacity/frequency and that they would not wait for ZAG airport authorities to propose it to them?

      Delete
    8. Why couldn't Dubrovnik handle more flights per hour? Is it because of the runway or approach or somethng else?

      Delete
    9. @AnonymousAugust 14, 2013 at 7:15 PM

      Zagreb airport management still thinks like old commies, they think if its not in their interests why bother, example TAP Portugal came not cause of Zagreb Airport talked to the TAP but cause Bologna airport asked TAP if they'd be interested.

      Same goes with Iberia, who never flew to Ex-Yu before, they came to Zagreb after massive sale of Zagreb city brakes in Madrid and Barcelona spurred Iberia to act.

      BA got back to Zagreb for the same reason, and nothing to do with Zagreb airport management, they are really really bad at sales and marketing, set in old commie ways, with relaxed attitude and if its too much bother, let someone else do the job as long as you can take the credit.

      Most foreign carriers are slow to react, primarily due to the fact that Croatian Airlines is so strong on some of the busiest routes out of Zagreb, example London, Amsterdam, Munich, Zürich, Paris are dominated by Croatia airlines, but when you have 32 flights to London each week by 3 carriers out of Zagreb and than massive space for additional growth, same with Munich, Frankfurt and Vienna, than you can see how much room there's for growth.

      This year Alltalia and KLM are starting their Zagreb runs, not sure is it from September or October, a great return for both carriers, would love to see SAS return.LOT, Czech Airlines and perhaps even Finnair introducing twice a week service to Zagreb. That'd be something.

      I can only hope.


      @AnonymousAugust 14, 2013 at 7:16 PM

      Not sure.

      Dubrovnik airport can handle same numbers as Split airport, just that airport is more of 7 day a week airport, Split Airport is more of a weekend airport, get all the flights during the entire weak cramped in to Friday, Saturday and Sunday, so its gets really buy than, where's Dubrovnik gets about the same number of aicraft operations each working day, so it never gets cramped up like Split airport.

      U think Dubrovnik has ILS Cat ILS II runway not sure 100%, there are plans to make Dubrovnik airport runway ILS Cat IIIa, when and if this was done already, I don't know, but even with Cat II Dubrovnik Airport should be able to handle at least 24 operations per hour in clear weather and 12 operations in poor weather.






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    10. @ Anonymous August 14, 2013 at 7:07 PM
      "Reason why i am so optimistic about Zagreb airport is what I see, the number of carriers recording really great load factors on all their flights to Zagreb, just yesterday Zagreb had 4478 passengers arriving on 78 flights, and half of them were small Dash8400Qs, the average now is 127 pax per aircraft operation, this is extremely good result, anything over 120 is extremely good, consider the fact that Hwathrow has 156 pax per aircraft operation."
      I am afraid that statistics are a bit misleading, because on official web page ZAG reports only landings (http://www.zagreb-airport.hr/Statistics-for-2013-335.aspx), not aircraft operations like BEG or LHR, so the number should be further divided by two. Hence, you have the following: ZAG - in 2012 around 60 passengers per flight, first 7 months of 2013 - 58. BEG - 75 in 2012, and 76 so far in 2013. And yes, LHR had 148 in 2012, but common, how much wide-bodies does it have A380s, etc., transcontinental flights.

      PS - I don't know if BEG and ZAG include into these statistics cargo flights and private jets, so the numbers might be slights higher (though I was rounding them up).

      BTW - 4478 passengers divided with 78 landings is 57, so you have a bit of number problems, I guess, or I am missing something that is obvious, cause I ain't no expert for aviation.

      Delete
    11. @vasingtonskverAugust 14, 2013 at 8:36 PM
      U think at Zagreb airport they count all landings, baring military flights, actual number of proper passenger aircraft landings is around 45-50 per day, other being general aviation, vip, cargo aircraft, anyone who uses Zagreb airport services. but number of cargo aircraft landings isn't that great, perhaps 3-4 per day and about same number of vip/general aviation landings per day.





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    12. I don't know. Although it is more or less irrelevant for the main point of my post, I think it is an interesting question, and someone who _knows for sure_ might say. Because, if you say it is 45 to 50 a day, it would make 1,395 to 1,550 landings a month (31 day, say July, I tried to count landings for today and it was around 47), the official statistics is 1,798 for 7.2013, so it would make discrepancy of 403 to 248 landings, or 13 to 8 landings a day, meaning it could easily include your estimated number of cargo and VIP/general aviation landings. How often does the Army fly? If it is less than 4 landings a day they might well include them in the statistics. If so is true, discrepancy in numbers is not small, according to this calculation it is from 14% to 22%.
      And in this example in av. No. of passengers per classical commercial plane in July is not 69,2, but somewhere from 89,2 to 80,3, and it is a significant difference.

      I know it is OT, but for me this is very interesting, and in a way very relevant.

      Delete
    13. Also, are the numbers of VIPs, private planes, corporate jets, and taxi flights included in the passenger numbers?
      I know it might be considered somewhat restricted business information, but at least for Belgrade Airport, I think that I am entitled to have these information accessible, as a proud shareholder of one share of BEG. :) Of course, if we flagrantly ignore a simple fact that these are public state owned companies.

      Delete
    14. HM, it was type, didn't meant to say U, box is so small can't see what I'm typing. Military flights are not included in figures I know that, and flights are conducted at least 7-8 times per day, a pair of migs take off and lands, but not atm, as most aircraft are being over hulled in Ukraine.

      As to Zagreb airport, yeah all information is free, you just need to call them, they'll give you any information other than information requested by companies not be disclosed i.e if some diplomatic or security informations, such as president or PM using government aircraft to take off and land. Government aircraft aren't included in this number. but if you looked at Zagreb airport website live cam today Government Challenger was parked at the end of platform whole day you could see it on a cam, it arrived from Split last night, and its still on the platform.

      Normally government and VIP jets are parked in general aviation and can't be really seen unless you really look, live cam is good but general aviation is just too far from the center of the terminal were live airport cam is.

      I guess daily Zagreb has 45-50 daily landings by proper passenger aircraft, max Zagreb airport handled in one day was in July 1st and June 30th earlier in this year when 170 landings were recorded on these two days, but Airport only recorded around 80 landings for both days as diplomatic and military flights are not added to overall landing numbers. (o yes Bil Gates was in Zagreb yesterday, all hush hush,he is spending holidays in Croatia with his family and met Croatian PM in Split and flew to Zagreb with Croatian PM...)

      I think average load per aircraft that lands at Zagreb airport is around 70 passengers per aircraft, which is a really good result considering half of all landings are regional jets and dash 8/400q operated by various airlines including Croatian Air.

      corporate jets are included, unless company states otherwise, example Elon Musk who was in Zagreb recently didn't want his aircraft to be recorded, also Google Boss that landed in Zagreb few weeks ago also wanted to remain private matter.

      All information is available from Zagreb airport, just call them, but for how long now that Paris Airport has taken over it'll remain to be seen.

      Delete
    15. Guys, BNX gets its chance once in a 4 months to be put into focus and you sprinkle your diarrhea on it bouncing your bullshit off one to another about ZAG, BEG, Dubrovnik etc. And what is worse, there's another topic about BEG besides. I wonder what sick idiots you are.

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. Maybe Serbia should start adding flights to Nis and the White elephant in Kraljevo. I am sure it would affect numbers at Belgrade in a negative way. Oops, maybe the government will have another bright idea and build another airport, which doesn't operate at all.

      Delete
    2. Croatia by 2020, 20.000.000.

      lol but probably true.

      Delete
    3. lets add them all,

      Zagreb: 5.1 million
      Split: 3.2 million
      Dubrovnik 3.1 million
      Pula: 1000 000
      Zadar: 850 000
      Rijeka: 300 000
      Osijek: 120 000
      Brac: 50 000
      Losinj: 30 000


      total: 13.75 million

      These are my prediction, could be less, could be a lot more.

      Delete
    4. Guys, BNX gets its chance once in a 4 months to be put into focus and you sprinkle your diarrhea on it bouncing your bullshit off one to another about ZAG, BEG, Dubrovnik etc. And what is worse, there's another topic about BEG besides. I wonder what sick idiots you are.
      Off course I expect one of you will appear saying you are not.

      Delete
  10. Cubrilovicu seljacino izgubio si 150000 turista

    ReplyDelete
  11. ExYu

    The Minister for Transport and Communication of the Entity of Republika Srpska, Nedeljko Čubrilović, said, “Unfortunately we were unable to agree to the terms set by the airline. It’s not as it looks. They aren’t coming here to give us anything, they want to come here to take something”.

    --------------------------------

    Why would an airline come to the havoc and give anything to anyone!
    They offered to do business.Wasn't it enough!
    Yeah, they came to take something, the passengers!

    The Government couldn't have accepted the offer for they had been doing wrongly since they were elected in 2006.
    How could political tycoons buy BNX if BNX is successful in business! Of course they can not. First it should be destroyed, kept on insulin for years and then grabbed at the right moment.

    Ex - Yu

    Mr. Čubrilović added Wizz Air requested subsidies for handling as well as for possible losses the low cost airline could incur on its services from Bosnia and Herzegovina’s second largest city.

    -------------------------------

    The same Government gave much bigger subsidies to Adria Airways for they flying from LJU to BNX for almost two years a few years ago and spent several millions, boarding a few passengers per flight. Now, their tycoon got a deal in Slovenia. That's the way they do business in the Balkans.

    Ex - Yu

    “During the talks they were very difficult over handling prices so we would not benefit from them in any single way”, the Minister for Transport concluded.

    ------------------------------------

    I think that that was said by the acting BNX's CEO.

    Ex - Yu

    Wizz Air inaugurated flights from Bosnia this summer with services to Tuzla. It has recorded solid results on its flights from the city. However, Mr. Čubrilović says Tuzla is providing large subsides to the low cost airline in order for it to maintain services to the city.

    ----------------------------------

    Only one thing the Government had to do, to provide the highest fuel price that can be accepted, it means 1.2EUR/ lit. Every airline asks for discount on handling fees. That's normal.

    Ex - Yu

    Wizz Air has not commented on its talks with Banja Luka Airport. It is still considering launching flights to the Bosnian capital this year.

    -----------------------------------

    Why would they?
    In addition, well mannered guys lead that company.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The statements of the BNX's acting CEO and the Minister can be reached under the link below

    http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1615626&page=3




    ReplyDelete
  12. A fortnight ago, an open competition for a chairman of Airports of the Republic of Srpska was closed.
    Two of the conditions for the position ask for at least the 7th level of education (It means VSS or Master degree, according to Bologna) and at least a 3-year experience on high positions in managing.
    After being rejected two times in the last two years and told he doesn’t fulfil the requirements, Mr Davorin Mihić, the acting CEO, has now applied third time.
    Actually, a few years ago, in his 42 year of age, he secured a Bologna bachelor-degree diploma at some college in Banjaluka, which corresponds to 6th level of education. That diploma is equal to “viša škola “ according to our old education system.
    The matter’s clearly explained in “Osnove kvalifikacionog okvira BiH”, signed by Mr Nikola Špirić, PhD, the Chairman of the Council of the Ministers of B&H, on 24th of March, 2011.
    Mr Mihić doesn’t even understand there is a big difference between the 6th and the 7th level of education. According to his diploma, he’s become a Manager in Civil Aviation (Menadžer u vazduhoplovstvu). Also, in his CV, there is no trace of running or working at any high level position in any company. Before he was appointed as the acting CEO, he had worked as a chief of a shift at Banjaluka Airport.
    After a several years of working at either such position or lower, now he wants to be the General Manager of the ground handling company.
    I wonder if he will be appointed as the CEO or at length told off and wiped out or the ad hoc Commission for carrying out the process of both selection and appointment of a CEO will just put the problem of not having the regular General Manager in the company for more than two years off for one more year keeping him as the acting CEO?
    For your information, after him being the one who has called the shots for almost two years, the company’s got into terrible condition. All things have been put upside down and the debt is as deep as the deepest part of the Adriatic sea. He’s told us, as far as he’s concerned, he was given a promise for one regular mandate and he’s hoping for the best.
    I wonder if he is taking us in for not being able to accept the reality or it’s in the bag as he says.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yesterday, the ad hok commission did an interview with the candidates who had been selected.
    One of them shouldn't have been selected for not having neither proper education nor working experience after graduating. The Commission has violated the conditions of the competition.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Regarding the interview, the following news has been leaked.

    At the end of his interview, a candidate who has applied for the position of the Operational and Technical Executive Director, and who had already been the Executive Director and who was unlawfully dismissed a year and a half ago because of coordinated action of some dishonest persons from the airport operator and the members of its Supervisory Board and who the hell knows who else, emphasized the need of speaking and writing in English but for executives and high heads.

    He asked a question about why the admission criteria didn’t not specify that the directors have to speak almost fluent English. He didn’t ask for a perfect English but knowledge which allows communication with colleagues from foreign countries and, easy reading of the manuals. Of course he thought of level we communicate here at ex-yu blog.

    To this his move, the President of the ad hoc Commission for implementation of the process of selection and appointment of the Director General and the Executive Director of Operations and Technical Affairs replied that, as far as she's concerned, the directors or senior bosses are not obliged to speak English at all!

    Mašala! Mašala!

    She stated she believes that both the directors and senior heads may use an interpreter!

    The madam is the Assistant Minister for Civil Aviation in the Government of the Republic of Srpska.

    She mentioned that, for example, she does not speak English at all, so what does it matter!
    Unfortunately, the lady doesn’t understand English is an official language in civil aviation.

    The question is why and whom she tried to stand by saying that!
    Whom is she manipulated by? For sure she is.


    ReplyDelete
  15. In order to get ready for Air Serbia flights to BNX, its Managing Board's rebuilding airport's restaurant.
    They know their stuff!

    ReplyDelete
  16. This is a clear result when a farmer takes over the control, creates his own Republic and makes sh*t of it....

    ReplyDelete
  17. http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1615626&page=2

    ReplyDelete

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