EU reports on EX-YU air transport progress

NEWS FLASH


The European Commission (EC) has for the first time in two years published progress reports for those aspiring to join the European Union, giving an assessment of what each candidate and potential candidate has achieved over the last year, as well as a set of guidelines on reform priorities. Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Kosovo received largely positive reviews from the commission in the field of air transport, which is contained within the chapter on transport policy. Notably, the EC expressed concern over Montenegro Airlines' sustainability but for the first time made no mention of Macedonia's policy to subsidise low cost airlines. Since Bosnia and Herzegovina only recently completed a comprehensive questionnaire covering all EU accession criteria, there is no separate report available on the country's transportation policy at this time.

The following are the full reports on air transport for each:

Macedonia
On aviation, the country has achieved a good level of alignment with the acquis although aviation safety legislation is only partially aligned. The country should pursue efforts to comply with the requirements under the first transitional phase of the European Common Aviation Authority Agreement. Full transposition and implementation of the Single European Sky legislation remain to be verified by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).The working arrangement with EASA covers all aspects of the acquis in civil aviation safety and environmental protection of products, organisations and personnel but further efforts should be made to facilitate EASA standardisation inspections.

Montenegro
On aviation, Montenegro has reached a good level of alignment with the acquis under the first transitional phase of the European Common Aviation Area (ECAA) Agreement and the Single European Sky. With the entry into force of the ECAA Agreement, Montenegro has yet to demonstrate that remaining open issues related to the first transitional phase can be solved imminently, in particular on economic regulation. Legislation is aligned with the acquis on aviation safety and was further improved in 2017 with designations on safety controls of aircrafts and airports. In 2016, Montenegro adopted a rulebook laying down detailed rules for the implementation of air traffic management (ATM) network functions. The national airline company 'Montenegro Airlines' is facing major sustainability issues, having accumulated significant financial debts. Montenegro has adopted regulations on airport capacity, schedule facilitation and slot allocation.

Serbia
Serbia has achieved a good level of alignment with the acquis on aviation and has made considerable progress with implementing the first and part of the second transitional phase of the European Common Aviation Agreement (ECAA). On the Single European Sky (SES), Serbia completed transposition and local implementation of SES I and SES II on air traffic. Legislation on aviation safety is aligned. Working arrangements with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) cover all aspects of the acquis in civil aviation safety and environmental protection of products, organisations and personnel. The suspension of articles on the licensing of air carriers and access to air routes should be lifted before the entry into force of the second transitional phase of the ECAA. Further engagement in technical discussions on normalising the lower airspace regime over Kosovo is needed within the Balkans Aviation Normalisation Meetings chaired by NATO.

Kosovo
On aviation, Kosovo has made progress in aligning with the EU acquis and has implemented nearly all the requirements under the first transitional phase of the European Common Aviation Area (ECAA) Agreement, with the exception of few provisions in the area of economic regulation relating notably to labour law. Kosovo has made some progress on alignment with the Single European Skies II framework and on implementation of the Law on the Air Navigation Services Agency, for which further efforts are needed for its full application. There is no legislation on combined transport.

Comments

  1. A imal' dje Bosne?

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    1. Ima tu je odmah pored Hercegovine

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    2. Bice uskoro,posto je BiH tek ispunila to,a ovi su vec to uradili.

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  2. A sori sad tek vido da je risentli komplitid

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  3. Šta to tačno znači za srpske dozvole letačkog osoblja. Da li neko ima pouzdanu informaciju kada će konačno biti punopravne EASA.

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    1. Great question. This would open possibilities for Serbia to provide pilot trainings

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  4. No Bosnia and Albania?

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    1. Edit: Just saw the part on Bosnia saying that it just submitted the Questionnaire. And Albania is not Ex-Yu, duuuh. Sorry :) However, Kosovo didnt even reach to the stage of submitting the Questionnaire, how come they have a report on air transport then?

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    2. There are reports on Bosnia in the past like Kosovo now but because they just did the questionaire in Februaey there is basically just a 20 page Eu report about democracy in Bosnia because the want to review the answers before the submit the report.

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