Sunday, August 21, 2016

Croatian airports see record year


Croatia's commercial airports have registered their busiest year with over 4.4 million passengers handled during the first seven months of 2016. Zagreb Airport maintains its position as the country's busiest followed by Split and Dubrovnik, which have seen strong growth throughout the year. Split Airport was Croatia's busiest in July, handling over 542.000 passengers, representing a monthly record. As a result, it was the first time a Croatian airport welcomed over half a million travellers in a single month. The figure marks growth of 25% compared to July 2015. The airport is expected to comfortably surpass the two million passenger threshold by the end of the year, which would be a first for Split.

Pula Airport has also put in a strong performance throughout the year, with its passenger growth averaging 16% over the past seven months. During July, the airport handled 116.334 travellers, marking its busiest month since opening its doors to the public in 1967. The figure represents an improvement of 33% compared to July last year. Markets which recorded the biggest increase in travellers to and from Pula include France, up 86% on 2015, followed by Ireland +53%, the United Kingdom +26%, Germany +22%, Russia +22% and the Netherlands, where numbers increased 15% compared to last year. The airport now estimates it will handle 400.000 passengers by the end of the year, its best on record.

Croatian airport results, JAN - JUL 2016

AirportPAXChange (%)
Zagreb1.533.107 6.6
Split1.230.536 17.9
Dubrovnik1.059.604 15.7
Zadar277.006 4.7
Pula234.632 16.4
Rijeka71.477 1.3
Osijek16.045 3.4
Brač6.328 53.2
Mali Lošinj3.892 38.8

The only two Croatian airports to have seen their passenger numbers decline during the January - July period were Osijek and Mali Lošinj. Osijek Airport says the downturn comes as a result of Trade Air, which temporarily suspended its domestic commuter flights for several months earlier on in the year while it obtained necessary documentation from authorities. Flights have since resumed and the airport expects to make up for the loss. Meanwhile, it is also considering its future with a potential partner. "There are interested partners from Slovenia, Switzerland, Denmark and several from the United States. It is now a matter of talking to them and selecting the best option", Osijek Airport's General Manager, Domagoj Marinić, said. The airport is considering either a strategic partnership, concession or a private-public partnership. The process is expected to be completed by the end of the year. Osijek Airport anticipates handling 40.000 passengers in 2016.

44 comments:

  1. Great news. Happy to see Zadar come back. They had quite a bad start to the year.

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    Replies
    1. What do you think will Zadar get over 500.000 passengers this year?

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    2. Wold be nice.

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    3. August will show

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  2. So Osijek is the next airport going up for concession? Do you people think it is better for airports to be put up for concession separately or should they be put up in a bundle by the state.

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    1. I don't see what OSI has to offer for someone to be interested. The airport is pretty much deserted and is sandwiched about half-way between BEG and ZAG.

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    2. Between BEG (185 km), ZAG (277 km), BUD (264 km) and TZL (150 km), Nemjee. Most of passengers fly from BUD.

      But still it is cute small airport with 2 check in, one gate, nice restaurant, small shop, few rent'a'car offices... Totally rebuild after war. I really like it!

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  3. Go Dubrovnik!!! No1 in Croatia!!

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  4. So do you think SPU could handle 2.1 million passengers? I am sure they will reach 2.5 next year.

    DBV should grow at a much fasteeeeer rate.

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    Replies
    1. 2.2 mil for this year probably. August should be just below 500k, September around 300k. So they will go over the 2 mil. threshold at the end of September/begining of October.

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    2. Split Airport could hit 2.3 million, I am projecting 2.25 million but could easily hit 2.3 million.

      Dubrovnik airport should hit 1.92 million and Zagreb 2.82 million.

      2017, Split should hit 2.55 million, Dubrovnik 2.15 million and Zagreb 3.12 million.

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    3. 5 year growth 2013-2018 will be bigger for ZAG than for BEG. BEG had big 2014 but overall ZAG is catching up and with new terminal will overtake BEG growth in percentage by 2018.

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    4. @AnonymousAugust 21, 2016 at 5:52 PM

      It is possible, but we'll need to wait and see, I'd rather see steady growth 5-8% over next decade than what Belgrade is experiencing now, 2 years of 20% growth and than frozen in its place.

      Zagreb's new terminal however should indeed play important role of future growth, and as soon as it opens it seems new terminal will to in to expansion, 8 additional passenger boarding bridges and terminal expansion might happen as early as 2020, expanding the piers from present 325 overall length (one end to other end) to around 670m, adding 75mx135m section to main terminal will expand new terminal to 135x210m or 100 000sqm.

      Maximum number of check ins will also go up to 100 and capacity to 10 million.
      Apron platform will also expand from 575mx175m to 875mx175 with 3rd taxiway access ramp added to expanded platform. Part of the platform will also expand to 340m width allowing for additional 15 free standing positions for A320/B737

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  5. Wow those are massive numbers for Split. Can imagine the chaos at the airport.

    Was expecting a bit stronger growth from ZAG considering all the new routes but still good growth.

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    Replies
    1. You got it right, total chaos, I work here. Numbers are great but everything else is very, very bad

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    2. New terminal was needed years ago...

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  6. The effects of loosing Tunisian, Egyptian and Turkish holiday markets will definitely be felt this year and Croatia will profit. Great results.

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    Replies
    1. Who were the customers of these markets?

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    2. People that probably would not go to Croatia but with nowhere else to go except Greece which is almost booked out as early as March or April they will go to Croatia.

      For example in the text it says number of Russian arrivals at Pula Airport grew. That's despite visas. But simply Russians had nowhere to go (especially since Turkey was unavailable until recently).

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  7. Congratulations. Good numbers. Zagreb and Dubrovnik are prepared to deal with increased traffic. Both are getting new terminals. Split on the other hand is supposed to get one but I'm not sure how that is progressing.

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    Replies
    1. http://www.exyuaviation.com/2016/08/split-airport-to-begin-terminal.html

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    2. Thanks. Missed that.

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  8. The way things are going Split could overtake Zagreb sooner or later.

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    Replies
    1. With current capacity restrictions I doubt it.

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    2. Between November 1st and March 1st Split Airport is dead, very little traffic. Zagreb is year round airport, with constant traffic, albeit very small terminal that was built for 2.0 million pax it is handling nearly 3 million now.

      2017 should be interesting year for Zagreb, 2018 in particular as new carriers start to operate year round service to Zagreb. Old terminal will be turned in to largest cargo terminal in these parts.

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  9. Very good numbers. Considering a population of 4.2 Mio, the amount of passenger throughput in the first seven months is impressive indeed.

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  10. By 2018 Croatian airports should handle 10m passengers combined

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    Replies
    1. Quite possible.


      Zagreb: 3.75 million
      Split: 2.75 million
      Dubrovnik: 2.5 million
      Pula: 500 000
      Zadar: 500 000
      Rijeka : 200 000
      Osijke: 50 000


      Quite possible.

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    2. only, and only if Split reconstruction and expansion finishes by summer 2018.

      hard likely

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  11. What is Zagreb Airport's monthly passenger record?

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    Replies
    1. Nearly 310 000 in July, projected 320 000 in August.

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  12. Like someone mentioned above, Croatia has really benefited from the situation in North Africa and Turkey so it will be interesting to see if we get a stagnation in growth over the next few years if any of these markets recover or if the growth will continue like this.

    Also, any news on ECA, did they start flying again on Friday or are they still grounded? (or is it watered) :)

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    1. Still grounded and will stay that way (personally I doubt they will ever fly again).

      I think Croatia will still benefit next year from the crisis at those tourist places. The only country I see recovering somewhat is Egypt. Tunisia is in a really bad place. Apart from the terrorist threat half of the hotels have been closed while the other half requires urgent renovation. The economic situation is very bad. People are hoping that the ousted president Ben Ali will come back from Saudi Arabia so you know things are bad if people are praying for him to return. As for Turkey, now that they are cosying up to the Russians, I wouldn't be surprised if western countries (in line with their two-faced policies) start warning people off from there (they already have in Austria for example).

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    2. @AnonymousAugust 21, 2016 at 3:42 PM

      Turkey is a mess, people will be less keen to go to a country where security is one of the major issues, nothing to do with Turkey being friendlier to Russia.

      Turkey isn't safe as it used to be, perhaps you have slept over past few months but Turkey was hit by 4 terrorist attacks and a fake military coup. I would think the average tourist will look at this and wonder if if it is safe to send his family to a country that is so unstable. Most Austrians are fully aware of political situation in the region and they're acting accordingly.

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    3. ^ don't get me wrong. Of course security is the main issue. Would not go to Turkey myself. Just wanted to sat that the recent change in direction in Turkey will also be another factor.

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    4. Same in Denmark. Regarding government issuing a warning against traveling to Turkey. Nothing to do with policy towards Russia, or Turkey, it's thoroughly about safety.

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    5. As far as I hear the charters from Vienna to AYT are still almost all sold out these weeks. Seems a large chunk of people do not have safety as their priority but rather the dirt cheap prices for package holidays in Turkey such as EUR 320 per person for a one week in 5 star hotel including 2 flights of over 3 hours plus 2 transfers. Someone or something is heavily subsidizing holidays and flights to Turkey ...

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  13. SPLIT and DUBROVNIK double digits growth very impressive

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  14. Da SPU ima vise mesta bio bi blizi ZAG ali bice zaniljivo videte u sledece vreme ko ce biti pobednik.
    INN-NS

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    1. Sine što ti provališ. Nema tu gubitnika, ni pobjednika. U Hrvatskoj ne smatramo da je potrebno centralizirali aerodrome i svi smo na istoj strani. Hrvatski aerodromi su dio jednog cilja, strategije i zajedničkog posla. Managementi tih aerodroma surađuju. Cilj nam je dovesti što više putnika u Hrvatsku, Zagreb kao hub, Split, Dubrovnik i ostali kao sezonska zračna luka namjenjena turistima.

      Ako jednog dana Split bude imao više putnika nego Zagreb neće zbog toga biti pobjednik, nego će pobjednik biti Hrvatska i svi ćemo od toga imati više, zar ne?

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    2. da je baba musko, zvala bi se Dusko. ali nije musko i ne zove se Dusko.

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  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

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