Monday, April 20, 2015

Serbia and Kosovo discuss future flights

Belgrade - Pristina flights likely to resume

Serbia and Kosovo have resumed talks on the establishment of flights between Belgrade and Pristina, which would link the two cities for the first time following a sixteen-year hiatus. Moderated by the European Union, the two sides and their respective Chamber of Commerce met in Rome last Thursday to discuss economic cooperation among which was the launch of flights between Belgrade and Pristina. However, the Kosovan Minister Without a Portfolio in Charge of Dialogue with Belgrade, Edita Tahiri, who attended the meeting, said flights between the two cities should be treated as a political, rather than an economic issue, and future services should be regulated and discussed only as a part of high level reconciliation talks between the two sides known as the Brussels Dialogue. For its part, the Serbian government’s Office for Kosovo said the service should not be politicised. The Office said, “Such a stance taken by Pristina politicises an issue which is important to both the citizens and the economy”.

Kosovan media state it is “a matter of months” before Air Serbia launches services between Belgrade and Pristina. Furthermore, an agreement signed between the two blocks in Kosovo’s ruling coalition, LDK-PDK and the Serbian Srpska List, foresee the introduction of flights between the two cities. Slot Coordinator at Pristina Airport, Driton Hyseni, says, “Both countries have targets to join the European Union, and direct flights will give a good signal that our two nations are leaving the past behind, and looking for a better future”. The two sides agreed to hold a conference between Serbian and Kosovan businessmen on May 9 in Gračanica, where potential flights could be discussed once again.

Air Serbia has made no secret of its intentions to fly to Pristina. In October last year, the carrier’s Chairman, Siniša Mali said, “Our goal is to eventually fly twice daily to all cities in the region but before we do that we need to connect the last two cities in the former Yugoslavia that we do not fly to yet - Zagreb and Pristina”. Air Serbia has since launched double daily flights to the Croatian capital. As EX-YU Aviation News learns, the establishment of flights between Belgrade and Pristina has been marked as a high priority by the Serbian government and services between the two cities could be initially launched by a foreign carrier which would be granted rights to operate the route. Last October, the Serbian government reached an agreement with its Kosovan counterpart to extend a free movement agreement, allowing Kosovan passport holders to transit though Belgrade Airport.

68 comments:

  1. Good news ! The ideal "foreign carrier which would be granted rights to operate the route" is Air Berlin.

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    1. Yep I have a strong feeling it will be either Air Berlin or Etihad Regional.

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  2. The biggest obstacle to the realisation of these flights is Edita. Get rid of her and you will have the flights.

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  3. This is great news. I agree that at first it would be best for some foreign airline to fly this route and later it could be started up by Air Serbia.

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  4. I have to ask whether BEG-PRN would be an economically viable route? I have no doubt it will launch this year or next but it sill start because of politics not because of economic factors.

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    1. They definitely will be. Both for O&D and transfer passengers.

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  5. I want these flights to be commenced, but I wonder how will Vučić justify the fact it's being done from "international departures" section.

    Anyways, these flights will be a jackpot, similar as Tirana.

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    1. 63% of Serbia says Kosovo is an independent nation

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    2. Look up b92 ipsos polls. Serbia is a leader in recognition of Kosovo independence

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  6. Adria Passenger Number Up in Q1

    Brnik, 20 April - Adria Airways carried 203,633 passengers in the first quarter of 2015, an increase of 8% on the same period last year, the airline told the STA on Monday.

    https://english.sta.si/2126700/adria-passenger-number-up-in-q1

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    1. This is great. As Adria has no hub protection any more at LJ it was forced to expand on new markets. So the free economy works. It is going to be more and more tougher for it when Fraport will introduce its own way how to get more out of LJU. But in case that it going to be sold ther will be no protection from the state any more. The situation in slovenian aviation will be changed for ever. Looking forward to see this metamorphic period.

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  7. @Ex-YU Aviation
    Don't want to be too harsh, but...
    (1) Edita Tahiri, who -- not which;
    (2) Edita didn't just "attend" but represented the Kosovar side.

    In any case, I welcome these flights whenever they materialise. It will be interesting to see how they will be handled (who will operate them and how they will be marketed), but I recall MAT Macedonian Airlines flying to PRN at the height of the Macedonian armed conflict without any issues. For a time I thought that B&H Airlines would be a good choice to open this line but that seems highly unlikely unless drastic changes take place. I am convinced though that JU itself can open the line without any issues whatsoever. Whether it will be a commercial success though I am not convinced at all.

    Interestingly, JU could be one of the first airlines to benefit from the PRN incentive scheme that is open to all airlines. Imagine if it even attracted a number of SKP bound pax - shock of all shocks ;)

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    1. Oh, and most importantly, before this line opens there must be a complete "normalisation" of civil aviation relations between Kosovo and Serbia, including but not limited to opening of the Serbian airspace to all PRN (and Kosovo, in general) bound flights. This may be the reason why Edita is 'reportedly' being firm.

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    2. Pristina gains nothing from being firm. The reality is that PRN needs JU more than JU needs PRN.

      Ms Tahiri should think of that before doing/saying anything else.

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    3. @Nemjee It's besides the point who needs whom more. Edita has been tasked with getting the best possible deal for Kosovar citizens. If she can achieve that by being firm then so be it. These flights are clearly being pushed by JU, so to get a win-win situation she (or someone else) must achieve a wider agreement encompassing open air space for airlines flying to both countries. "Inat" should best be left aside.

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    4. Actually, it's really not besides the point. PRN has become far less competitive since the collapse of Belle Air. SKP is winning (big time) the war with PRN and all of this is not good for the economy of Kosovo (which, as we know, is almost non-existent).

      So, in stead of making demands and being firm, they should drop the act and make these flights reality. Like I said, JU can walk away from this deal and not be harmed in any way. However, if the talks with JU fail, then both PRN and the region of Kosovo will be at a loss.

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    5. And anyway, JU can always serve Kosovo via Skopje and Tirana.

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    6. But nemjee, you know that polititians don't operate this way. you think that she or anyone close to her knows anything you said about the PRN market? She knows JU (and in turn GoS) wants something and she is trying to score some cheap political points.

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    7. @Nemjee you're clearly not reading the same reports that the rest of us are. The discussion for this route was initiated by JU, not PRN. So, the 'JU can walk away' argument is moot since JU are the ones that want to open the route in the first place. But don't let facts get in the way of a good story.
      What I am arguing is this: whatever agreement is reached needs to be fair and beneficial to both sides (only an ill-informed fool would call this political point-scoring). Who benefits more really is beside the point. It is clear to see that the Serbian sides stands to benefit more such a deal. If JU can fly to PRN than it is fair to expect that PRN-bound flights should be allowed to fly over the Serbian airspace (and pay for the privilege). The Serbian government would benefit from additional revenue, JU would gain access to a new market (small and poor, but a new market nonetheless), whilst certain PRN-bound passengers would benefit from more convenient flight paths. Win-win one could argue. But you go ahead and put inat first and analyse who benefits more and if it's not you then threaten to walk away.
      Bringing SKP into this argument was utterly unnecessary. Despite "winning (big time)" SKP is still smaller than PRN. WRT this topic I take the long term view, he who laughs last laughs the best. Let the competition thrive.

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    8. "only an ill-informed fool would call this political point-scoring"

      I don't know if this is directed towards me but first of all calling someone a fool is not the nice way to treat people. Regardless of what you say, every negotiation two sides had so far reflected were very much influenced by a daily politics. If politicians had common sense and/or interests of their respective masses in mind, many things would be sorted out by now (including this one). Instead (imo again) both sides are using this to score cheap political points.

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    9. JU might have approached PRN first but that doesn't mean that they will fly there at all cost. Furthermore, as we can see, it's the Serbian side which is showing goodwill while the Albanian side is sabotaging it by bringing politics into a purely economic discussion.

      Personally, I think it's highly disrespectful that PRN airport is called Adem Jashari. The Serbian side should ask for a name change... or why not, maybe we can rename Morava into Arkan International Airport. There we go. Serbia can open its airspace if they change the name. Sounds pretty fair to me. ;)

      As far as PRN vs SKP goes, for the time being there is no indication that PRN will bounce back. Wizz Air is slowly building up a solid presence there and they don't seem to be slowing down. Naturally, time will tell who will laugh the last but I wouldn't bet my money on PRN.

      Поздрав.

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    10. SM,

      Of course, I agree with you but I was just saying that they better realise that in the end they are the ones that have something to lose.

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    11. Haha, a good post by Nemjee after a LONG time. Seems like the winter depression is over ;)

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    12. @Nemjee pozdrav to you too.
      We will have to agree to disagree, I am afraid. I am not sure what goodwill has been expressed when JU has simply asked to open the route. There is no sabotage (you seem to pay too much attention to 'zuta stampa'). A goodwill would of been expressed if all restrictions from both sides are lifted (win-win). Again, the Serbian side stands to benefit more, but as long as both sides benefit from the deal it's only rational that an agreement is reached. Not rocket science. I am not privy to the ongoing negotiations (and neither are you, I am guessing) and I have zero trust in the gutter press to report what the details of these negotiations are. However, if you believe that the ban on PRN-bound airlines from using the Serbian airspace is a 'purely economic' decision then you're naive, very naive.

      Finally, you seem to jump from one topic to another. All I will say is that I am certainly not a fan of naming airports (PRN will do for me, thank you very much) and I am most certainly not a fan of naming PRN Adem Jashari. However, if we can reach the point of only disagreeing over such details then we will have made a lot of progress. Having said that, I truly could not care less what Morava, Nis, Belgrade or even Skopje names their airport(s): Alexander the Great, Constantine the Great, Nikola Tesla, Arkan International or Slobo National.

      Wrt SKP, only a fool would disagree that they've had a successful 3-4 year period. But you still do not acknowledge that PRN is bigger than SKP in terms of pax (second best in a two-horse race). Plus JU might come to PRN, so things are not all that gloomy ;)

      Përshëndetje!

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    13. If we take into consideration the relationship between Serbia and its breakaway province, then Air Serbia's (and the government's) will to re-establish direct air links is most definitely a sign of good will. If Serbia is ready to turn a blind eye to many things then Kosovo should do the same and, like I said, they should not politicize a purely economic matter- one from which Kosovo will profit the most. Especially since JU already flies to both PRN and TIA.

      I am not jumping from one topic to another, I was merely pointing out that the name of the airport is shameful and that it should be changed. It's no different than you bringing in the overflight rights into the discussion. These are all matters of civil aviation thus being highly relevant to this discussion.

      As far as SKP goes, they have one huge advantage over PRN and that is that they have the full backing of their political elite which is not only speaking of developing the civil aviation sector but they are actually doing something about it. Look how far they have come. A few years back they had a failing national carrier and a terminal that looked more like a shack then an international gateway. Today, they have Wizz Air with three A320s based there and a brand new terminal.

      I guess time will tell who was right and who wasn't. In the end, I am sure JU will launch PRN flights. It's only a matter of time.

      Поздрав.

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  8. Belgrade-Pristina dialogue in Brussels resume tomorrow so they might discuss it tomorrow as well.

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  9. Kod ovakve vesti ne može čovek a da se ne zapita ko je nekim generacijama uzeo četvrt veka života da bi se ponovo vratili na isto da avionom idemo do Zagreba i Prištine, verovatno u neko dogledno vreme samo sa ličnim kartama kao i pre 25 godina?

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    1. Upravo to, bravo za komentar!

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    2. Tesko za Zagreb ako se ukine granica izmedju slo i hr.
      INN-NS

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    3. INN-NS zar ti sve bukvalno shvatas????????????? Ovdje je vise bilo istrijsko-filozofska konstatacija, nego iznosenje cinjenica!

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  10. Istina, ne samo da je nekome uzeo 25 godina života, mnogima cijele živote, ada ne govorimo o generacijama koje su osiromašene na dulji rok. I zatrovane primitivnim nacionalizmom.

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  11. ASL se vise isplati da leti za INN nego za PRN
    I odlicne vesti za BEG SR tehnika je dosla.

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    1. Ali to nije u skladu sa strategijom Er Srbije. Zašto lete poluprazni avioni za Budimpeštu? Zašto se leti za Varnu, a ne za INN? Zašto se leti za Varšavu i pored konkurencije iz lota? Misliš da oni ne umeju da čitaju brojke?

      Austrija je teritorija koju za sada ASL ne želi da dira. Cilj je bivša Jugoslavija, centralna i istočna Evropa, i Mediteran (koliko stignu). Zato ovakav izbor linija. Cilj je uspostaviti brend.

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    2. Zašto točno misliš da bi se više isplatio INN u odnosu na PRN? Imaš neke konkretne brojke ili feeling?

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    3. INN bi bio jako profitabilna destinacija i najvise transfernih putnika za IST i jos mnogo razloga.

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    4. S obzirom na jako dobru povezanost IST općenito, ne misliš li da bi bio jak priitisak na te cijene za JU da to bude neki jak argument za uvođenje linije? Koje su još destinacije u igri koje iz INN u isto vrijeme imaju potencijal volumena, ali dopuštaju više cijene zbog nedostatka konkurencije ili nekih drugih razloga? Ima li business class putnika koji bi išli point to point?

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    5. SVO-ATH-AUH-MEL-SYD-IST i jos nekoliko balkanskih destinacija. Ovde ima nekoliko business class aviokompanija. Ova routa bi bila jako profitabilna to mogu garantovati.

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    6. Uh, uz neke ME3 opcije + TK koji vrebaju u blizini, nekako mislim da bliski istok i australija teško da bi baš mogli biti zlatni rudnik....a ne znam da li bi JU baš mogao stavljati neke jače cijene od konkurencije i za moskvu ili atenu. Nisam siguran da li brkaš broj putnika sa profitabilnošću - meni se čini da bi pritisak na cijene bio dosta jak. K tome JU nije neki brand u Austriji da bi realno netko platio extra da leti sa njima. Vjerojatno bi morali ići ispod cijene da ih se odabere jer nisu ime - bar ne u Austriji.
      Imaš li neke analitičke alate koji su ti naveli te destinacije ili koji drugi rezon upotrebljavaš?

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    7. Nekoliko mojih profesora je letelo sa JU i imaju reci hvale. SVO - ATH su jako skupe iz INN.
      EY ima codeshare na letovima AB za INN-
      INN-NS

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    8. Pa nisam mislio da je JU dobra/loša kompanija, nego je stvar branda, tj da se uopće zna za kompaniju, frequent flier baza itd...svaka čast tvojim profesorima, ali mislim da je stvar malo kompliciranija kada se neetko odlučuje ulaziti na tržište.
      Koja je veza EY code share sa AB sa potencijalnim letovima JU?

      Možda su karte skupe zbog manjka opcija (iako što to znači skupo - tokom cijele godine, skupo u odnosu na što?, što znači da bi opet konkurent morao spuštati cijene. A ako je potražnja veća od ponude, možda bi neka od etabliranih kompanija već povećala kapacitet ili bi OS/SU poletjeli direktno?
      S obzirom da garantiraš uspjeh, mislio sam da imaš neke jače argumente ili studije da nas uvjeriš?

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    9. Ja sam cuo tza neku studiju koja je radjenja pre 7-8 godina da bi lf bio preko 80 %.
      Ovo sad ozbiljno pricam OS leti direktno i S7 preko zime za DME.
      INN-NS

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    10. @ INN

      you should use proper punctuation such as comas in your sentences. This way it looks like JU should fly from SVO to IST via ATH, AUH, MEL and SYD.

      Travel demand is bigger to Pristina than to Innsbruck. Many Serbian businesses operate in Kosovo (eg: Delta) and a direct air link could be positive for cargo traffic, something thats not the same for Innsbruck. There are 7 daily bus departures from Belgrade to Pristina (Fjolla, Erhan, Adio) which has only been increasing the past couple of years. JU also fly to many cities where Kosovars have resettled, which is good for transit traffic. Lets not forget, you talk much about how much you know JU but forget that JU is not a diaspora shuttle, its not some random 'StojadinTrans' from some random town in Serbia where most people are travelling with the entire house except for the kitchen sink, all for 50€ return plus the little 'pocket' money they give border police. When the air fare from BEG-VIE return was 9.000 din, the diaspora was still mostly travelling by bus from Erdberg.

      PRN would also help fill potential JFK flights.

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    11. Iz Innsbrucka svaki dan osim CET i NED ima bus.
      I jos zaboravljate mnogo vecu kupovnu moc Austrijanaca koji jako mnogo putuju. I jos koliko turaka putuje za MUC da bi letelo za IST. Ne znam mozda gresim
      INN-NS

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    12. INN-NS, lijepo je vidjeti da si romantičar u određenom smislu, ali studije od pred x godina vjerojatno više uopće ne vrijede danas. Sve se promijenilo. Za početak pogledaj samo status PRN. O recesiji i poziciji Rusije, Grčke da ne goovrim, A tek o TK, ME3....

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    13. Mene zanima misljenje G Aэrologic-a sta on misli koja je isplativija linija.
      INN-NS

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    14. Mislim da se ovdje definitivno barata sa premalo podataka...ali, forum i je za ležeran razgovor pa zašto ne. Moje je mišljenje da s obzirom na konkurenciju, povijesne veze, i geografsku poziciju PRN apsolutno ima puno veću šansu za dobar posao za JU nego INN. Kupovna moć je možda manja, ali definitvno se mogu stavljati bolje cijene, lakše se etablirati te raditi feed drugih linija + što ima P2P potencijal poslovne vrste.

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    15. Korean Air Kargo nosi kargo iz INN.
      INN nije povezan ni sa jednom Balkanskom zemljom osim leti i ko hoce za Aziju da leti mora iz FRA i molim g Aэrologic da kaze sta on misli posto skoro uvek se to i ostvari.
      INN-NS

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    16. INN-NS why are you not using your blogger account with that nice ASL A380 pic hehe.

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    17. INN-NS...ako je INN tako profitabilna destinacija pored svih alternativa koje ju okružuju, što su svi ostali debili pa ne lete direktno za tamo? Daj izbaci neki pošteni argument a ne zazivaj forumaše u smislu proroka, Dakle ako doični aerologic kaže da je INN ok, odmah se uvodi linija? :) Pa daj neki normaln argument svojih razmišljanja, razumijem da imaš želje za let za BEG, sve pet, ali daj neke argumente - konkretne za promjenu.

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    18. Pa jesam rekao skoro svi turci lete iz FMM . MUC je jako skup , a jako dosta aviokompanija leti za INN. A SZG necu da spominjem zato sto su Autobuske karte duplo jeftinije a i duplo se brze stigne.
      INN-NS

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  12. Small chance to see Albanians transiting via BEG for PRN..

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    1. But it already happens. JU went quickly from 3 p/w to daily, even upgauged on certain days from ATR7 to A319. Most travel agencies in Tirana, Durres and Shkoder have JAT or Jat Airways stickers on their window along with the other airlines they sell tickets for. Besides this, there is 7 buses a day between Belgrade and Pristina. Many Kosovars have Serbian travel documents (passports and ID cards) and are able to get them.

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    2. You obvously don't frequent Serbian highways that much. There are A LOT of busses with KS reg plates, and many CH/D/A cars are in fact going to/from Kosovo. No reason not to take the plane instead if the price is right.

      Also, Kosovo residents can use their Kosovo ID cards - no need to have Serbian travel documents, albeit they're issued "temporary" Serbian documents (a piece of A4 paper) for their transit. This is done by the police at the border and is an automatic process, just takes a little bit of time. I would say for airside transit they wouldn't even bother...

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  13. I think the biggest news in this article was the fact that PRN has a "slot coordinator!" Really? I could see LHR needing such position, but PRN? What a joke!

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  14. Flying with Air Serbia from Sarajevo to Melbourne, I have found out that my transit time at Belgrade Airport will be 7 hours and 10 minutes (between my flights from Sarajevo, and to Abu Dhabi).

    I am an Australian citizen. Therefore, I can enter Serbia without a visa for up to 90 days.

    Taking into consideration that the airport will take care of my luggage since I am only transferring in Belgrade, will I be allowed to leave the airport to do some sightseeing in the city, and then to come back for my next flight? Obviously, I would not need to go through check in and would therefore head straight to customs and passport control.

    I have had a look at some pictures of Belgrade Airport, and it does not look like a place that I would want to stay in for 7 hours and 10 minutes! Without any doubt, I would rather spend at least 3-4 hours in Belgrade, leave some money there and learn a thing or few about the city and its people.

    How long is the taxi ride from the airport to the centre of Belgrade?

    Has anybody ever done this?

    Thank you in advance. Your help and advice is much appreciated!

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    1. I'm originally from BEG but living in VIE and use Air Serbia anytime I can with a 6-7 hrs stopover, for the sole purpose of visiting friends and family :)

      This stopover is perfect in my opinion - just make sure you take a proper registered taxi. There is a taxi counter at int'l arrivals, but the exact location... I'm not sure, I order taxi by phone so I can't really tell. But there is a Serbian Tourist Organization counter after you pass through passport control but before you exit customs (in the baggage claim area, as soon as you descend from passport control) so you can ask there.

      Depending on the weather and time of your stopover, I would agree that you can start at Republic Sq. or nearby Terazije, explore the pedestrian area and the Fortress and have a meal at Beton hala for example. Any restaurant will order you a taxi if you ask them and getting to the airport will take approx. 20-25 minutes.

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    2. No airport is interesting for 7 hours let alone Belgrade.

      My advice is to take the A1 bus from the airport to Slavija Square. It costs 300 dinars (~AUD$3.50) and takes approx 30 mins (similar to taxi time). From Slavija you have several trolley bus lines to Republic Square. Actually 1 stop further is Student Square, Belgrades oldest square. Kalemegdan is 2 minutes walk and a great place to stroll and experience a nice view of Belgrades rivers, Sava and Danube. Knez Mihailova is there too. Obilicev venac is full of cafes to enjoy a nice coffee, but Cafe "?" just across from the Saborna crkva is one of Belgrades oldest. Skadarlija is just 2 mins walking distance from Republic Square, which is a lovely Bohemic cobelstone pedestrian street filled with cafes and restaurants (ps recommendation is to eat elsewhere, food not worth the money paid). From Knez Mihailova, walk through to Terazije, and to Nikola Pasic Square where the Old Royal Palace is, the place where our royalty lived. Being at Slavija, up the road (1 min walk) is Saint Sava Cathedral.

      http://www.beg.aero/upload/a1_mapa_i_red_voznje.pdf

      http://wikitravel.org/en/Belgrade

      Google maps will assist on pointing out on a map where places are and to help make your plan.

      Note that alcohol can be cheaper than coffee in most if not all cafes :) Average coffee price is 100-180 din. (AUD$2), snacks from the many bakeries roughly the same.

      Public transport is cheap and very frequent, a day pass is around AUD$3. Taxi between the airport and city should not cost more than 1500 din (~AUD$15) each direction. Do take note of taxi number plates, the legal taxi will have TX at the end of number plates (ie: BG 1234 TX).

      What ever you do, enjoy our lovely city :) Welcome to Belgrade :)

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  15. With an Australian passport you should be able to leave the airport and head to the city. You`ll probably get all boarding passed in Sarajevo but I would always double check with Air Serbia transfer counter once you land in Belgrade.

    Belgrade Airport is small and cozy, but definitely not a place where you want to stay for 7 hours.

    Small piece of advice. Once you get out of the airport make sure you catch a real taxi drivers, because there are a lot of fakes going around the airport. There should be official transport counter after you pass the customs, but ask someone over there to make sure. The ride should not be more or around 10 EUR (1200 Dinars). Ask them to take you to Republic Square, that`s the downtown. its a 25-30 minute drive.

    Enjoy your stay!

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    1. It's now a flat fare from the airport to anywhere in the city of 1800 dinars.

      Also, there's the A1 bus that runs every 20 min to slavija for 300 dinars.

      Another option for spending layover time is the aviation museum beside the airport.

      make sure you get a taxi voucher at the stands by the door and avoid anyone who asks you if you want a taxi

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    2. Taxi from the airport cost me the most. Last month it cost me just under 900 din to the airport from New Belgrade, where as from the airport it cost me 1.400 din - and that was taking the voucher at arrivals. The taxi situation is very shameful for visitors visiting Belgrade, unfortunately.

      The bus seems to be quick and frequent, and is very cheap. Its easy to find on Slavija.

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  16. Hi anonym from MEL. Great city you are from.
    All doable. I think Taxi ride is around 20min. Of course consider the usual peak hour traffic jams. Someone from BEG will be able to tell u apx transittime in rush hour. Definitely worth going to BEG and not stay at the airport. I think BEG internet tourist info is www.tob.rs or something similar
    Enjoy yr travel. Greets fm Sao Paulo

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  17. Letovi JU za PRN bi imali smisla tek kada/ako počnu tetovi za Sev. Ameriku.
    Postoji ogromna kosovarska diijaspora u Njujorku, ne sumnjam da bi PRN-BEG-JFK bila uvek medju najjeftinijim konekcijama na ruti.
    Sada to nije potrebno jer JU jedva da može da održi trenutni red letenja sa postojećom flotom.
    Trenutno je JU u fazi Stabilizacije gde će se ići na bolje punjenje kabina a ne nove linije, čak ni nove linije na postojećim frekvencijama, osim ako ne dodje do naglog porasta tražnje.

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    1. @anon 10:26 pm Eventualno uvodjenje letova za PRN će se desiti svakako pre letova za Severnu Ameriku a ne posle. I TIR je dobar primer.

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    2. za TIR nemam informacije, voleo bih da čujem od vas koji imate pristup informacijama o punjenju kabina da to češće delite u okviru dozvoljenog naravno. Ako je punjenje za TIR dobro onda je jasan razlog loša ponuda letova odatle, imaju do svakog sela u Italiji ali nemaju ništa ka istoku Evrope, Bliskom istoku itd što BEG i JU imaju. PRN ima nešto bolje konekcije i konkurenciju.

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    3. Demand from Tirana is more for Italy because that is where alot of the Albanian diaspora lives, hence the reason why most flights out of Tirana are bound for Italy.

      The Kosovar diaspora is more in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, more spread out in the EU. Not as many are in Italy, hence why there isnt many if any Italian destinations ex PRN.

      There is a market for JU in both, I see TIA and PRN being double daily in the short term. TIA sales seem to be doing well for JU to upgrade and upgauge capacity to TIA.

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    4. The flights to Tirana have been well packed right from the beginning of operations, otherwise Air Serbia would not decided to increase the number of frequencies. Still, ATR's 66 seats is appropriate capacity.

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