Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Croatia with EU's oldest commercial fleet

NEWS FLASH


The European Union's statistical office Eurostat has published a report showing that Croatia has the block's oldest commercial fleet, with 61% of all registered aircraft in the country aged over twenty. It is followed closely by Sweden (60%), Bulgaria and Lithuania (55%), as well as Slovakia (52%). Aircraft aged twenty years or over also make up more than a third of the fleet in Estonia (43%), Romania (39%) and Denmark (37%). At the opposite end of the scale, less than 10% of the aircraft fleet is aged twenty years or over in Finland (2%), Luxembourg (6%) and Ireland (7%). Conversely, a significant share of the fleet is made up of recent aircraft (aged less than five years) in Hungary (44%), Malta (42%) and Luxembourg (31%), ahead of Poland (26%), Germany and Ireland (both 25%), the Netherlands (23%), the United Kingdom (22%) and Spain (21%). In contrast, operators in Croatia have no aircraft less than five years old, and in Lithuania (4%), Sweden (6%), Romania (7%), Greece and Latvia (both 8%) fewer than 10% of the fleet is made up of aircraft less than five years old. The United Kingdom is the leading aircraft operator in the EU, running more than 1 250 aircraft.

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15 comments:

  1. Interesting chart. I wonder where would Serbia stand :D

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    1. Well only 7 out of 19 of Air Serbia's aircraft are over 20 years old so that's 37%. The remaining commercial aircraft in the country are operated by taxi companies Prince Aviation and Air Pink and they both have completely new aircraft which are a couple of years old. So it would be where Romania is.

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    2. Haha, good comeback. +10000 ;D

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    3. I was actually not meant to be rude, I was curious, so thank you for explaining and as for good comeback comment, you obviously misunderstood my comment/questions.

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    4. If you want to stay out of trouble, general rule is not to mention Serbia when topic is Croatia, and the other way around. Easy.

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    5. Just because there are nationalists on this board (and everywhere in our society), that will not stop me from mentioning Serbia when the topic is about Croatia.

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  2. Well at least we are for once right next to the Swedish standard :D

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  3. Bravo Hrvatska! :)

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  4. Age is not a big deal, it's the state of maintenance that really matters

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    1. In general. But when your country has got pretty much the oldest machinery in whole of Europe, perhaps its time to consider refreshing those old planes.

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    2. First, it's not the whole of Europe, but EU, also with what money should OU buy them?
      Also, new planes are supposed to come in the coming years.

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  5. Hrvatska lider u regionu, a i šire!

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  6. You may always want to turn stats the way you want. Does it count when Adria leases 29 years old plane from an airline who has accident history, or when Air Serbia operates with overmature 733's, too?
    Nowdays not much help to operatae NEO's before the issue with engines is fixed. So what the purpose of this stats?

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    1. It explains clearly that it includes only planes registered in the country. Air Serbia has nothing to do with this. It's not part of the EU. Read the article again.

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    2. Who cares about where the planes are registered. It's another mainstream populism. Read the thread twice of you don't get it first.

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