Thursday, May 31, 2018

Serbian regulator rejects Syria's Cham Wings

NEWS FLASH


The Serbian Civil Aviation Directorate has refused to issue a permit to Syria's Cham Wings Airlines which planned to commence a three weekly service between Damascus and Belgrade, the "Aviatica" portal reports. Syria's largest privately-owned carrier intended on operating flights between the two capitals each Monday, Wednesday and Friday starting June 1. The Directorate has not given a reason for its decision. Belgrade and Damascus were last linked with a scheduled air service a decade ago. In 2008 Jat Airways suspended flights to the Syrian capital along with a handful of other destinations such as Tirana, Prague, Malta and Tripoli, as part of its cost cutting measures. Services to the Syrian capital operated via Beirut at the time with Jat holding fifth freedom rights on the very short sector.

13 comments:

  1. Good decision IMO.

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  2. First the Turkish widebody and now this. Yet they had no problem allowing Wizz Air to open a base in BEG. They didn't block them because of politics.

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    1. Wizz Air is EU company and Serbia have signed open sky agreement with EU so every airline from EU can fly freely between Serbia and EU. On the other hand Serbia and Turkey have bilateral air agreement that is more restrictive.

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    2. You are partially right. The Open Skies Agreement between Serbia and the EU has removed any barriers as far as the establishment of new flights goes but not the opening of bases.

      That said, according to local laws, Wizz Air should have been allowed to open a base in Serbia only after it registered its aircraft in the Serbian registry. Operating under a Hungarian registration falls within the legal twilight.

      As for Turkish Airlines, it made absolutely no sense. In April alone the number of Turkish visitors to Serbia grew by 31% to 8.721. Capacity upgrade is real, not fictional.

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    3. Which local laws? Plenty of airlines operating aircraft registered in other countries, even legacy carriers (Alitalia, Aeroflot, ...), not to mention the LCCs.

      It's nice to see they don't have to give any reason as to the decisions they make. So 2018 and all that jazz.

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  3. Sadly this is probably a good decision.

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  4. Da nije ovo međusobno povezano?

    https://www.b92.net/info/vesti/index.php?yyyy=2018&mm=05&dd=31&nav_category=167&nav_id=1399004

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    1. Држава та не би смела да се буни имајући у виду колико је њених грађана исто тако бежало пре 20-ак година.

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  5. Who are those anonymous idiots saying 'it was a good decision'? Cham Wings flies to Moscow, Yerevan, Muscat amongst other airports. What is worse in those cities than BEG?

    Serbia had an opportunity to become a first on the European market just like in the case with Iran while this time the political pressures were simply far too strong or a lack of will or long-term political vision is to blame.

    Nothing to celebrate in-here but a lot to regret.

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    1. You have to chose who do you play with. Those you have listed above or the rest of Europe. Being the first is not always good. Especially if you're exposing Serbian people to problems down the line.

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  6. I don't see a problem with establishing a new route with Damask.. It is sad to see that they simply refused, with no further explanation

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  7. Without knowing the reason we can only speculate, it could be a simple issue that will be resolved and they will reapply for the permission again.

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