Air Serbia hiring B737 pilots and first officers

NEWS FLASH


Air Serbia is seeking qualified type rated captains and first officers on B737-300 to -900 series aircraft for its dedicated Aviolet charter brand. General requirements include a valid EASA flight crew licensing, Serbian Civil Aviation Directorate (CAD) or validated license acceptable to Serbian CAD, class I medical and English language proficiency. Further terms and conditions can be found here. The application deadline has been set for February 14, 2018.

Comments

  1. So the B737s are here to stay.

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    1. nice love those 30+ years old aircraft :)

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    2. ^ I realize you are being sarcastic but they are looking for pilots on the B737-300 to -900 series, meaning they could lease newer generation Boeing next year.

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    3. No actually in this case I am a real aviation enthusiast and love to fly the jet. I wish we would have more MDs around :(

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    4. Every 737 pilot in Europe has a license that says B737 300-900 on it. I doubt Air Serbia has a plan to get new B737 as it would make absolutely no sense, when they already have fleet of A320s.

      Choose one or the other...

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    5. Anon.@11:12
      To get all series (300-900) require differential training. You can still get rating on only Classic or NG.

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    6. Nope, you get rating for 300-900 and this is what Air Serbia requires. Differences training is a very very minor thing in this story.

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  2. Kolika placa???

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    1. Sigurno je daleko više od proseka... ako se traze inostrani piloti onda bice nesto kao na zapadu

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    2. around 6000€ for a captain and 3500€ for FO.

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    3. Netto ili brutto?

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    4. Plata 500.000 yud za cpt, bez obzira na nalet. Kako su oterali instruktore, kapetane i kopilote u periodu septembar - novembar, ja bih debelo promislio.

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  3. Probably because ex-JAT 737 pilots are near retirement...

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    1. And those planes are too.

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    2. Just few months ago they fired, I think, 14 pilots from 737 fleet.

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  4. Will Aviolet be converted to the JU low cost division? 134 seats is not bad at all.

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    1. Alen Šćuric Purger20 December 2017 at 13:18

      Low cost with 3 planes?
      Low cost with 31 year old and thirsty plane?
      Newcomer where other LCC (Wizz, Ryanair, Eurowings, easyJet, Norwegian, Transavia) would start double routes and dumping in second to destroy it in begging (like they did so many times to kill potential competition).

      That would be the worst decision they ever made.

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    2. Yep, 737-300 from mid 1980s will be very competitive against A320neo and B737MAX. Fuel consumption, reliability, speed, very competitive.

      Airlines are lining up to buy this amazing aircraft from Air Serbia.

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    3. I didn't know that the aircraft maintenance would be that expensive. But yes, the age is definitely an issue. Pity.

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  5. Alen Šćuric Purger20 December 2017 at 13:15

    Here are several things to note:

    1. That is 4th or even 5th tender for 737 pilots in some 2-3 years. So strange for fleet of 4 planes, so it is some 35-40 pilots (from this year even less, for 3 planes). Is there big exodus from Air Serbia (number of those planes are not increase but decrease, so there is no need for more pilots because of capacity rising)?

    2. 737-300 will stay at least one more year, probably even longer, as if not they will not open tender.

    3. That puts in question A320neo. For sure they should not have old 737-300 in fleet in case A320neo will come, but will change them with present A320ceo.

    4. Is it clever to have dual fleet 737/A320 especially that 737 are so old. Woulden't it be more rational to unify fleet on A320 family. I do understand that 737 is in ownership, and costs nothing (A320 lease is not cheap) but still, cost of dual fleet (pilots, maintenance, system...) is very big.

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    1. There is not an exodus of pilots. They hire pilots for the B737 on a contract basis for the summer. So it's not a permanent position. They leave after summer.

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    2. Netacno. Pojedinci su imali ugovore na godinu dana i isticali su na prolece 2018. Jedna grupa je poslata na godisnji odmor bez i reci objasnjenja da ce im biti prekinut ugovor (sto se i desilo), druga grupa je je poslata na “bezbedonosne provere”, a sve se zavrsilo preranim prekidom ugovora krajem Novembra.

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  6. I suppose the A320neo story ends here.

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    1. That's right !!!

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    2. the story was only a story for the very beginning. How do you guys imagine they would pay 1B USD for 10 Neos...it is mission impossible for Serbia!

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    3. It is not paid by Serbia at all. It is an order made by Etihad that plans to give JU 10 new neos. That was made clear from the start by Etihad and Air Serbia. The reason it may not take the neos next year is because it has nowhere to deploy so much capacity. They will go straight to Etihad instead.

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    4. Od NEO se odustalo u potpunosti, sto je donekleci ocekivano. Razlog potraznje pilota na 737 je sto su prvo odlucili da rashoduju dva od cetiri “klasika”, a onda im neko rekao da su dnevno po cetiri Busa u hangaru i da je ostvareni mesecni nalet Boinga 300 sati (jer menjaju Buseve na redovnim linijama). Konacno je progovorio glas razuma i sva cetiri klasika ostaju i lizuju se jos dva Boinga. Al’ piloti su najureni.... i vec su nasli uhlebljenje van Srbije.

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  7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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