EX-YU airlines handle 5.2 million passengers


The national carriers from the former Yugoslavia handled over 5.2 million passengers during the first three quarters of 2018. Croatia Airlines, Adria Airways and Montenegro Airlines all recorded growth when compared to last year, while Air Serbia's figures declined, with the airline also operating fewer flights.

Air Serbia continues to maintain its position as the busiest national airline in the former Yugoslavia, despite a drop in the number of passengers handled. According to Belgrade Airport's quarterly report, the carrier welcomed roughly 2.043.000 travellers during the first three quarters of the year, representing a decrease of 4.9%. The number of operated flights was reduced by 1.5% over the same period. The report suggests that the airline held a passenger share of 46.4% at Belgrade Airport. At the same time, foreign carriers recorded significant passenger growth amounting to 17.8%. Air Serbia itself is yet to publish any official operational results for the year so far.

Croatia Airlines handled a record 1.705.470 passengers on board its aircraft during the January - September period, an increase of 3.1%. Of those, 412.420 travellers were carried on domestic flights, up 1.4%, while 1.223.170 passengers flew on international services, an improvement of 2.5%. The remaining 69.880 passengers were carried on charter flights, up 24.4% year-on-year. However, charters accounted for only 4% of overall traffic. The airline operated 21.891 flights during the first three quarters of the year, which is up 1.7% compared to the same period in 2017. The average cabin load factor stood at 73.7%, down 0.5 points. Loads were down on international flights by 0.2 points for an average of 73.9%, while they declined 0.1 points to 72.4% on domestic services.

AirlinePAX (million)Change (%)
Air Serbia2.04 4.9
Croatia Airlines1.71 3.1
Adria Airways0.983 5.1
Montenegro Airlines0.528 13.6

Adria Airways welcomed 982.597 passengers on board its aircraft during the first three quarters of the year, representing an increase of 5.1%. The Slovenian carrier introduced seven new routes this summer, while the number of operated flights also grew. Unlike a part of last summer season, the airline did not maintain services out of its former base in Lodz in Poland but it recently stationed an aircraft in Paderborn in Germany, which will have an impact on its fourth quarter figures. Earlier this year, the carrier said, "Figures show we are on the right track, but there is still a lot of work ahead of us".

Montenegro Airlines handled 527.532 passengers during the January - September period, representing an increase of 13.6% on 2017, thus making it the fastest growing in the former Yugoslavia based on percentile growth. "The growth in all sectors of traffic comes as a result of the implementation of the optimal commercial strategy, as well as the responsible planning of resources and costs, which all had a positive impact on our operational results during the year", the airline said in a statement recently. Montenegro Airlines accounted for almost a quarter of all passengers passing through the country's two international airports - Podgorica and Tivat.

Comments

  1. So:

    Croatia Airlines with 14 planes - +3%
    Air Serbia - 19 planes - -5%
    Adria Airways 21 planes - +5.1%
    Montenegro Airlines 6 planes - +13.6%

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    Replies
    1. Croatia´s untlisation of their production is obviously best.

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    2. Adria did not operate with 21 planes in first three quarters. It doesn't operate 21 planes today either.

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    3. What do number of planes have to do with traffic increase / decrease?

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    4. ....With the magic word - "Productivity"

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    5. It's easy to count the aircraft numbers but you forgot about the seat capacity.
      OU turboprops are smaller and no wide-bodied aircraft.
      JU has more A32S + A330 which offer more seats.
      JP probably has less seats given the size of the country + market but still very good results
      YM also has impressive figures and the temporary lease of the B737 classic has shown very good results.

      It's a real pity that IN is not in the list. Still remembering the beautiful livery with the MK sun and that trendy CR9 jet...those were the days.

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    6. Number of planes and percentage increase/decrease have nothing in common and does not do any justice

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    7. Air Serbia - 2606 seating capacity
      Adria Airways - 1754 seating capacity
      Croatia Airlines - 1560 seating capacity
      Montenegro Airlines - 678 seating capacity

      Source: Airline Webpages.

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    8. Either way, JU has the biggest seat capacity in Yugoslavia simply because it´s the largest country in it, not so difficult. Thanks.

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    9. Yes, biggest populated country in EX-YU, with biggest fleet, yet only slightly more Pax than OU or JP.

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    10. But it has the smallest number of tourists. So why aren't Adria and especially Croatia Airlines bigger?

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    11. @"Anonymous20 November 2018 at 09:02
      So:

      Croatia Airlines with 14 planes - +3%
      Air Serbia - 19 planes - -5%
      Adria Airways 21 planes - +5.1%
      Montenegro Airlines 6 planes - +13.6%"

      Croatian Airlines operated 14 aircraft for only 4 out of 9 months, first 5 months, OU has a fleet of only 12 aircraft. And from November 1st only 8 aircraft are in service, with 4 undergoing C and D checks.

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    12. Very good question.
      Also the country with lower per capita comparing to Slovenia and Croatia which are also EU countries.
      Everything easily forgotten

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    13. A 10:19

      Question on point. Compare Serbia and Croatia international tourist arrivals and ask the question why the heck does Croatia Airlines have less passengers than YU?? Not to mention Croatia is in the EU.

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    14. Croatia is in the EU with a higher GDP but has a population twice as small compared to Serbia.
      Croatia has more tourists but Serbia has more transfer tourists.
      Slovenia has the highest GDP in the entire region but has a population almost half of Croatia yet still a decent fleet.
      Montenegro has to be the "winner" in this case given its population and double digit growth.

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    15. @Anonymous20 November 2018 at 12:28

      What is a transfer tourist??? I am bit puzzled with your analogy.

      Serbia: 7.1 million , GDP: $41.6 billion
      Croatia: 4.2 million, GDP $61.2 billion
      Slovenia: 2.05 million, GDP: $50.8 billion

      No idea where you get more transfer tourist from, perhaps from transfer trnsferables, perhaps nontransferable or just simple transfers? Croatia will have around 20 million tourists this year, 18 million foreign, Serbia as in whole 3.3 million, less than half of them foreign.

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    16. Serbia with 2 airports has a total 7 million pax in all airports, Croatia with 9 airports has 9.
      Still based on your GDP logic, Serbia is richer:
      7,1*41,6= 295,36
      4,2*61,2=257,04

      SPU+DBV combined = BEG
      INI has the same share of passengers compared to Rijeka, much more touristic.

      JU has A330 and OU not.
      JU has long-haul and OU only regional.

      In the end, the bigger you are the more you have.

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    17. All of you "my is bigger" fanboys from all, or maybe better to say both "sides", I am going to remind you of one fact only - 30 YEARS AGO JAT Yugoslav Airlines had 4 million passengers, and all three Yu airlines JAT, Adria and Aviogenex had 6 million, more than these peanut sellers today, so absolutely nothing to be proud of, but ashamed only

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    18. @Anonymous20 November 2018 at 13:52

      LOL, don't tell me, you were absent from your math class ? LOL
      Still you failed to explain to me, transferables, nontransferable or was is transfers, lol.

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    19. Transfer tourists = tranzit
      BEG is a regional hub and the crossway between the Balkans and the rest of the world + USA.
      ZAG only relies on long-haul from other carriers and also the sole EK seasonal destination.

      Anyway, back to numbers. JU is bigger and has a more diverse and versatile product.
      OU is more of a domestic carrier because it connects the Adriatic to the rest.
      Each airline is specialised in something.
      JU is more into transfer and charter.

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  2. Air Serbia's flight operations didn't decrease by much this year, yet passenger numbers are down more. I guess the hybrid system didn't work out at all.

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    1. That's why they launched a marketing campaign.

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    2. The only thing that saved them from an even bigger passenger decrease is a strong charter season.

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    3. Indeed. Numbers in scheduled traffic obviously fell sharply. Charter season was really good! Overall it is good they are ditching unprofitable frequencies. They should abandon the hub concept altogether

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    4. I wouldn't be surprised if the number of connecting passengers fell now that they butchered their network.

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    5. Does anyone know the split between scheduled and chartered pax for JU?

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    6. "Air Serbia's flight operations didn't decrease by much this year, yet passenger numbers are down more. I guess the hybrid system didn't work out at all."

      This is false logic. In order to know whether the hybrid system worked out or not, you'd need to know the financials. A 5% drop in pax is not much if they're now making 10%-15% more revenue per pax, which is realistic considering the fares.

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  3. Does anyone know the average load factors for the other airlines?

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    1. How would you like to calculate LF? For LCC is is a ratio tickets sold / seats on offer. For network carriers it is ASk / RPK.

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    2. As far as I'm aware, Air Serbia had the highest load factor last year, Croatia Airlines second, Adria third and Montenegro Airlines fourth. Air Serbia managed a load factor of over 70%, the rest hovered in the high 60s. Montenegro Airlines 65%.

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    3. Wrong actually. This is the official LFs for 2017. All are quite poor

      OU - 74.4
      JU - 73.4
      JP - 66.9
      YM - 65.0

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    4. Exactly, a flight with LF80% to JFK will significantly boost LF all over the network, as JU calculates their LF ASK (JFK has a lot of them) / RPK.

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    5. JP at approx 65% on none ACMI flights. LF does not tell u much and missleads. All of these airlines has very high overhead costs brought forward. Whoever didn't restructure (read:adapt) in the past is suffering now. AS the only one "tried" but not good enough. p.s LF is offered seats Vs sold. very simple.

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    6. This year JU will hardly reach LF 70% even if charter flights are included in calculation. But nevertheless, LF 70% is not so bad.

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    7. All exyu airlines need to improve their LF.

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    8. @ Anon: 09:24 "..p.s LF is offered seats Vs sold. very simple." - it is nice to know you do not have any clue about the aviation business ;) This method is only used by LCC. Network airlines calculate it differently. Look it up..

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    9. I am not anon 09:24, so please be so kind and provide us a credible professional link explaining how "LF is offered seats Vs sold." is not a proper methodology. I suppose you have to factor into LF also seats taken by crew members, all industry discount tickets and tickets bought with miles, however all of these (except shipping crew from one post to another) are tickets actually paid to the company.

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    10. LF as "offered seats vs. sold" is a completely useless metric in itself. That's why virtually all legacy airlines report it based on ASK.

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  4. Any estimates on how many passengers each could handle by the end of the year?

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    1. Despite some forecasts JU will remain number 1 in ex-Yu

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    2. My guess
      Air Serbia 2.4
      Croatia Airlines 2.2
      Adria 1.3
      Montenegro - 610,000

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    3. I doubt JU will loose 200,000 passengers compared to last year. In fact, it is impossible.

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    4. @ Anon at 09:27 "My guess Air Serbia 2.4 mill...."
      One have to understand that JU figures in their reports present only "commercial passengers" while BEG reports take in account all ie. total number of passengers. Thus BEG figures for JU number of passengers are approximately 2.5% higher than JU original figures.
      So JU will present cca 2.49 mill. passengers in 2018, while BEG reports cca 2.55 mill. JU passengers.
      All in all, JU is going to lose some 130.000 passengers in 2018, not more.

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    5. "All in all, JU is going to lose some 130.000 passengers in 2018, not more."
      Given the fact that charter season was good - how many passengers are they going to loose on scheduled services?

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  5. Congrats Montenegro Airlines. They are really working hard to turn things around.

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    1. They still have massive debt which is still there.

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    2. The stare will write it off soon.

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  6. Finally combined together they have handle more passengers than JAT in 1987.

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    1. Considering JAT was handling over 4 million in the late 80s and was not a monopolist, I would hardly say 5,2 million 30 years later is wow.

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    2. Actually they achieved that in 2016 for the first time.

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    3. You are right. Took them long enough.

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  7. Adria's passenger results are disappointing considering how many new routes they launched. And all the flight cancellations will have an impact on fourth quarter results.

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    1. The repercussions of those cancellations could be quite serious. People simply don't trust them anymore and don't want to fly with them.

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    2. ^ This is true. They are driving away a lot of passengers with their disorganization, cancellations, delays, wetleasing of archaic aircraft etc.

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    3. I can only confirm this for myself.
      They rescheduled a flight i was supposed to take and i lost a whole day of my vacation because of this.
      Furthermore i always book 2 or 3 months in advance and i won't be doing this with JP since i don't know if they are gonna be around for that long.

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    4. It's unfortunate how much their reputation has been affected this year.

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    5. Have the cancellations eased a bit?

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    6. Yesterday 19/11 they canceled the flight to Moscow. For the rest they have been quite alright for what I can see the past week.

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    7. I am afraid SVO was cancelled because of SU , not for operational reasons.

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  8. Lets not forget that profitability is very important here. If flights increase is not profitable than we can't say it is a positive thing.
    According to Sinisa Mali the money that GoS provides to JU mostly goes to cover the costs of JFK route meaning that the rest of the network is not in red.
    The rest of ex-Yu carriers do not have TATL/long haul flights but despite it they financial results are terrible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Sinisa Mali is the CEO of Air Serbia and he gladly communicates on behalf of JU and their results (He also works on the financial reports and is a well qualified person with insight into aviation). That is the reason, why no one else literally dares say or publish any numbers from JU itself. I suggest Angela Merkel should comment on Lufthansa´s numbers in the future. Then the people employed there and the laws governing the publication of certain figures become also irrelevant.

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    2. Sinisa Mali was the member of the Supervisory Board of Air Serbia and not the chancellor.
      Angela Merkel is a chancellor and not member of the Supervisory Board of Lufthansa.

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    3. Also, isn't Lufthansa privately owned?

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    4. If they really spent most of 32 millions EUR subvention per year (that was amount for last year, and they said it will be same this year) just for JFK route which has average of 3,8 flights per week than they are total lunatics.

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    5. 1. the part that goverment covers for JFK is used to lower the operating costs and are not clearly visible in the P&L statement. it comest to about 12mil€
      Mali was refering to those.

      Here is how they are marked in the financial statement

      "Tokom 2017. godine, matično Društvo je primilo RSD 1.431 milion od Republike Srbije, a na ime podrške razvoju saobraćajne mreže, a u cilju podsticaja i razvoja turizma i opšte povezanosti Srbije u skladu sa Strategijom razvoja turizma. Navedeni iznos je prikazan kao umanjenje već nastalih povezanih troškova."


      2. then there are the subsidies of about 20mil€ clearly visible in P&L statement

      "Grupa je priznala prihode od državne pomoći u skladu sa svojim računovodstvenim politikama u iznosu od RSD 2.466.569 hiljada (2016: RSD 4.951.993 hiljada)."


      -------------------

      total money received for 2017 is ~32mil€

      mali was talking only about the first part

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    6. 32 mil is too much for country like Serbia. That money could be much wisely spend to improve people's lives.

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    7. That was exactly what GoS did with these 32 mil.
      Supporting air carrier who is paying taxes in Serbia, where many people work and support their families, bringing foreigners and gastos to Serbia to spend their money and support local economy etc.

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    8. hm...how many times we have to explain anon 12:43 xD
      All of that would happen even without government support. People would fly anyway. Aviation professionals (those who really have some skills) would easily find jobs at home or abroad.

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    9. In the end is BEG-JFK subsidised like the SKP routes or not ¿
      Somebody here mentioned that the JU business class is payed by the Serbian taxpayer, isthat also true?

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    10. If the idea is to support JU employees, 32M Euro is too much. Imagine the government pays 500 Euro monthly each JU employee, then they will require only (500 x 12 x 2316 =) 14M Euro annual. With the remaining 18M they can subsidize LCCs and convert Belgrade into a new Budapest!

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    11. 500€ is to small for pilots. How are they supose to afford flashy watches, alimonies, second wife, mistress, unsuccessful side business and unreasonably powerful car...?
      Sound nice, doesn't work!

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    12. Who cares the pilots, whole Europe continent is struggling with crew shortage. They can find a job anywhere.

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    13. There you go again with your critics towards the pilots!
      Leave them alone, please!
      No pilots = no planes
      No planes = no holidays or business
      No holidays or business = sad people

      Pilots should be treated like kings and queens because this is one of the most (if not the most) stressful and difficult job in the world.
      You all think it´s like a game with a joystick and so easy to ride an aircraft.

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  9. Would someone like to explain how with its market growing around 20% Air Serbia recorded a decrease?

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    Replies
    1. Because passengers went to other airlines. They are cheaper and offer more than what people get on Air Serbia. Keep in mind that more and more airlines are competing directly against JU, among them LCCs.

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    2. They really need to reconsider fleet plans. With the current business model they will need smaller planes and few A320 for charters and most popular routes.

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    3. They have no fleet plans. There is nothing to reconsider.

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    4. Their fleet is not their main problem, unrealistic pricing was. They are paying for the mistakes they made in the past...well, mistakes made by AUH.

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    5. They are in complete mess and so overpriced. I am shocked over and over again when I buy 300-400 Eur ticket to Brussels or London and see the plane 40 or 50% full.

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    6. They need to amend the Airbus order and instead of A320NEOs to get A220s.
      The hub plan clearly didn't work at all.

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  10. It is really sad that all mentioned companies are still alive only due to illegal support (one way or another) of their governments.

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    Replies
    1. There is no illegal support. That was explained to you some days ago.

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    2. Unless you include into that all the discounts FR/W6 are getting from the state airports and start from there...

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    3. Governments in ex-Yu are not doing anything differently than many other governments in Europe when it comes to their airlines.

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  11. How many passengers Wizz handled on flights from/to EX-YU in 2018 so far? They are probably getting close to these four airlines combined.

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    Replies
    1. Last year they had a bit over 2 million passengers on ex-Yu flights.

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  12. So OU is probably doing best since it added the most passengers compared to last year.

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    1. The concerning thing is that it is adding passengers while finances are going from bad to worse.

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    2. Yes fantastic result... At the same time easy Jet handles over 1 million passengers to Croatia each year and flies for a total of 5 months per year. Shows that OU should focus much more on the coast in the summer.

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    3. ^More like 7 months per year, not 5. But you are right. Croatia Airlines could and should do more on the cost in the summer time. But tht requires more aircraft.

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    4. OU must open summer bases in Split and Dubrovnik and place 2 A320/321 in each. These four planes could bring over 1 mil passengers and 200mil+ revenue annually.

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    5. If OU was doing that well, it wouldn't have had the need to sell LHR slots

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  13. And what was AS LF?

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    Replies
    1. They didn't report it, it is written in the text. Last year it was 73.4%.

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  14. The most important of all is their financial results.

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    Replies
    1. Yes I'm very interested to see them. JP has confirmed it will have a loss (significant loss), as has YM (but smaller than last year). It looks like OU will also have a loss. Not sure about Air Serbia. I'm shocked at the profit they posted for 2017 so I won't make any guesses for this year.

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  15. I agree that these results overall are a sad state of affairs.

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    Replies
    1. But things are getting better gradually.

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  16. And what about their nearest competitors - TAROM, Bulgaria Air or CSA? How are they doing so far in 2018?

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  17. All airlines are facing significant competition in their home markets. Considering this, I think they have done quite well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many airlines have not used the full potential of their hone markets.

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  18. Katastrofa!!!!
    Ovi lete cisto da bi letjeli!
    AS s 19 aviona mora bolje
    OU....katastrofa je preblag izraz.
    JP........tko lud tko zbunjen?
    YM....ima nade

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  19. A good reality check as to how small and unsignificant all these airlines are.

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    Replies
    1. They could have been bigger and more significant had they had a professional management.

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    2. Just like their homelands.. Dead end of Europe....like it or not

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  20. Congratulations Croatia Airlines, Adria Airways and Montenegro Airlines!

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  21. At least Croatia Airlines is transparent enough to report its full operational and financial results unlike all other ex-Yu airlines.

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    Replies
    1. And it should as 100% public company. Only other airline that should be required to post such results publicly is YM.

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  22. Kada Er Srbija bude privatizovana, tada ce se izdignuti u svakom pogledu. Dali ce drzava i dalje tvrditi da je nacionalni interes?. Verovatno da hoce. Politicari su nasledili mentalitet uprvljanja monopolom... Kada ne ide biznis tu je porez. Narod je tu da finasira "nacionalni interes." Koliko Evropskih kompanija je Drzavno, i koliki profit prave na slobodnom trzistu... Verujem da ce Er Srbija opstati. Iskreno jer je volim. Na zalost voljenje ne pravi efektivnost i profit... Ali pravi manji broj ljudi, odgovornost i efektivnost...
    Rodney, Sydney.

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  23. I really hope next year these airlines will increase their passenger numbers and launch new routes.

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  24. Not surprising about Air Serbia. They decreased flights this summer and suspended sone routes.

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    Replies
    1. At same time Adria launched 7 new routes, Croatia Airlines introduced 3 new routes.

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    2. While Croatia Airlines did introduce new routes it suspended a few others.

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    3. Which routes Croatia suspended? So not true.

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    4. Zagreb-Pristina and Split-Nice.

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  25. This only shows the might JAT used to be in the 90s.

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    1. I think you means the 80's. The 90's were a time to forget for JAT.

      As to the legitimacy you claim regarding its might, you forget that the 80's (and earlier), was a period where aviation - bilaterals and especially pricing - were regulated; there was much less competition and ofcourse, little to no LCC's - the real game changer. Ofcourse, ex-yu was a unitary country with effectively 1 monopolistic carrier as well.

      So JAT's might - in such a world that existed at the time - was really overstated. What would be interesting however, is to see how JAT would make out in these times - with LCC's, free markets, open skies etc etc

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    2. @Anonymous 20 November 2018 at 12:47

      Nobody would be able to force openskies on Yugoslavia just as it didn't happen with Turkey where their home airline went from 'chicken-size' into Phoenix's rebirth.

      Same with Aeroflot or Israel where airlines were given the time to develop a critical mass before eventually letting LCC's in.

      Alternatively, JAT could create its own LCC and that could be Adria.

      Wizz Air came to Serbia as a vulture when both JU and the country were on their knees. Unfortunately, their plans didn't quite work out.

      Now that openskies are in-force nobody is forbiding them to expand and open more than dozen vital places of connection across the European continent or obtain Serbian AOC and fly beyond to places like Israel, Georgia.

      They're bringing zero benefit in terms of connectivity and investment in the market unlike what they're doing in Budapest. They copy-pasted JU's gasterbeiter-heavy destinations and stuck to it after easy-money.

      National airline is one of the pillars of country's economy. Airline that'll be able to invest into long-term benefit vs. short-term profit. A LCC will never be able to do that.

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    3. Well it is comparing apples and oranges but JAT was an atrocious airline in the 1980s. Had the misfortune to fly with them when I was a child, customer service from the Gulag School of Airline Hospitality, lol. Simply horrible!

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    4. @An.14.00

      Yeah right! That's why DC10 flew LHR-BEG on some days full with transit passengers from UK flying on to Dubai, Singapore and Australia, and that's why JAT had 4 million passengers per year, because all of them voluntarily flew with Gulag and other BS you wrote. Of course nothing ever in life is ideal, of course that even today you can find crew member or airline staff member who is not the perfect example of hospitality, but some times it can just be the response, because it takes two to dance, and writing about "Gulags" based on a single (maybe) bad experience is mean, evil and not correct at all towards 90 % of people, me among them, who used to work for JAT at that time professionally and responsibly.

      @An.12.10

      JAT was not monopolist. Adria flew on most important domestic services as well, to Germany, Italy and Cyprus on scheduled services, and both Adria and Genex flew much much much more charters than JAT. Aviogenex was flying 500.000 passengers per year between Yugoslavia and the UK only. Not one single service except Tirana was subsidized or dotated, and over 30 foreign airlines flew to Yugoslavia on regular bases, of course on ground of bilateral agreement which, just like today, represented legal frame only, and could have not affected which airline the passengers are going to choose, and 4 million yearly, half-half yugoslav and foreign citizens had been choosing JAT

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    5. I do agree that "writing about "Gulags" based on a single (maybe) bad experience is mean, evil and not correct". From my experiences - and I was very demanding teenager in 80s - JAT and Adria both had great service, much better than Air Serbia or Adria today. I flowed domestic mostly using Adria (only one flight with Adria was international from LJU via Beg to LCA) and several times by JAT from LJU to LHR and ones from LJU to JFK and back to ZAG. Of course, I'm also a bit nostalgic, however I fully agree with "pozdrav iz Rijeke". Using Gulag in the same sentence with JAT or the whole Yugoslavia is fare from the reality and more in line with the discourse of "fake news".

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    6. @pozizrijeka - JAT WAS largely monpolistic. Adria and Aviogenex were never allowed to compete directly against JAT on any route - remember it was a planned central economy in those days ... just in case you forgot

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    7. That central planned economy worked much better than the today's one.

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    8. @An.16.09
      Beograd-Ljubljana,, Ljubljana - Sarajevo - Skopje, Ljubljana-Split-Skopje,, Beograd-Zagreb, Sarajevo-Zagreb, Mostar-Zagreb, Zagreb-Split, Ljubljana-Dubrovnik, Zagreb-Frankfurt, Zagreb-Stuttgart, Zagreb-Hamburg, to name just few routes operated by both JAT and Adria. For the planned central e conomy I can just say BIG LOL, because every single company in ex-yu was separate and independent company exposed to the market with its own mostly competent management and workers partcipation. And for the end I am so sorry for you brainwashed kids who are not aware what Yugoslavia was and why it had to dissapear

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    9. Oh, and btw. I just forgot :Actually Adria was THE FIRST Yugoslav airline to operate flights to NORTH AMERICA, with its DC-6. Probably because of all these JAT monopoly. And because of central planned economy. LOL! Cheers!

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    10. Not really...Yugoslavia abandoned central planning economy some time in the 60s. At the point you're talking about here the system was what is known as market socialism - the market exist, but the state has a large role in the economy. A lot like China today.
      If it were a centralized economy there would've been only JAT, just like there was only Aeroflot in the USSR. The fact that Adria and Aviogenex had not just existed, but also had a significant share of the market just prove that there was at least some competition.
      It's pretty similar to France where both Air France and Air Inter were government owned carriers competing against each other. Had the war not broken out and Yu remained united, JAT, Adria and Aviogenex would've probably merged at some point in the 90s to remain competitive to western airlines following the deregulation.

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    11. btw I was replying to the person above, not you pozdrav iz Rijeke

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  26. Interesting data. I hope ASL increases number of passengers before launching new long haul routes in 2020. Otherwise, dangerous times for its finances may come...

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