Foreign carrier eyes new Slovenian airline


Former Adria Airways employees who were tasked with looking into rescue initiatives for the flag carrier have said a foreign airline has plans to set up a new company at Ljubljana Airport. The airline, which cannot be named at this point for confidentiality purposes, has proposed to register a Slovenian company and employ former Adria staff. The newly established carrier would use the Air Operator’s Certificate of its foreign owner while all aircraft would be leased. Former Adria personnel believe this is the best way to quickly establish a new airline. It has been reported that an offer has already been submitted by the carrier to Ljubljana Airport.

In 2015, Adria Airways itself helped establish a new airline in Estonia following the demise of Estonian Air. For a year following the foundation of Nordica as the successor to the bankrupt carrier, Adria was its most important partner, providing it with a booking system, as well as operational services and staff training. Nordica has since suspended scheduled flights, with several routes taken over by LOT Polish Airlines but continues ACMI (aircraft, crew, maintenance and insurance lease) operations for foreign airlines, among which was Air Serbia this summer. Latvia’s airBaltic recently outlined its growth strategy until 2025 which will include the opening of new bases across Europe, while LOT has said it will put a greater emphasis on the Balkan region. The Polish carrier, which boasts a base in nearby Budapest, is said to have already contacted a number of Adria pilots over job opportunities.

Meanwhile, Adria Airways staff are being served with job termination notices as the company’s bankruptcy proceedings get underway. In its 2018 financial report published this week, Adria Airways registered a net loss of 18.573.706 euros im its last full year of operations. It marks the company’s second biggest loss in its history, and a significant increase from a net loss of 5.4 million euros in 2017. Despite this, the airline's CEO, Holger Kowarsch, said in the report, “Regardless of the adverse impacts, we strive for continued growth and stable operations. The national carrier is an important part of Slovenian identity, as well as an indispensable element in establishing the country's business relations with the world, developing tourism and science. Therefore, we will continue to strive to keep Adria Airways an important partner of the Slovenian narrative”. The full financial results can be viewed here (in Slovenian, PDF document).




Comments

  1. I think they need to let it go. They are beating a dead horse. Time to move on with their lives. Slovenia is too small to sustain a profitable national airline.

    If Cyprus is struggling with its 10+ million passengers a year then I don't see how Slovenia can be successful with its 1.8.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But this is a foreign airline that wants to set up something in Slovenia with own AOC. Didn't S7 Airlines do the same thing in Cyprus?

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    2. Yes, they did, they have two A319. They are so successful in Cyprus that they are already announcing flights from Greece to Europe. So much for that.

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    3. I just don't get why would a foreign company go to the trouble of establishing a new company in Slovenia when they can just base their own planes there if they are from the EU. Wouldn't that be easier?

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    4. @Nemjee 0902h

      Good morning Sir and yep +1 to yr comment

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    5. Maybe that's what the government demands from them before giving subsidies?

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    6. Nemjee10 October 2019 at 09:02

      The same stands for all ex yu airlines !!! Not one is profitable, but yet they all exist if not thrive .....

      Who can explain why they are important for Serbia, Croatia, Montenegro, Bosnia, and not for Slovenia ??

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    7. Because market conditions are different in Serbia and Montenegro. Governments can cover losses while those in Croatia and Slovenia can't. Pretty simply really.

      The only airline that's doing something to change its relatively bad situation is JU. At least they are using those government subsidies to grow and increase their passenger volume without which they can't survive.

      You think OU will not suffer the same fate JP did? Croatia might extend their life support in one way or another but it's not like before EU accession when they could just give them a blank cheque.

      You can no longer put all of ex-YU countries in the same basket because the region is no longer homogeneous. In any sense of that word.

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    8. Anon 9:23,

      Saying that all airlines in exyu sphere are losing money is true although the situation at JU and the other airlines is quite different and not comparable.

      OU has sold off absolutely every asset imaginable. They desperately need money from the government to continue operations because without the money they are unable to pay for vital expenses such as engine maintenance. OU's market share in dwindling (particularly in vital tourist regions).

      Air Serbia on the other hand is using the money more as an investment. Air Serbia is not perfect, but they are trending upwards with smaller and smaller subsidies every year and more and more passengers, destinations, and aircraft.

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    9. Also LJU airport is situated in the country that it only covers Gorenjska and LJU larger urban area. The rest of the country in Novo Mesto, Koper, Nova Gorica or Maribor already focus on other airports abroad.
      Lets not forget that BEG alone has around 1.8 mio habitants and thats already more as LJUs market potential is

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    10. maybe it's LOT?

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    11. Nemjee with Cyprus mania again. Are you seriously comparing a mega touristic island with a Central European wealthy nation?
      Cyprus Cyprus everyday.
      Plus, if Slovenia can afford an airline, then why not?

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    12. LJU must become LCC airport for the region. Only way for them to have big number of passengers.

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    13. JU520 BEGLAX

      Not only that but BEG is far more aggressive than LJU is. After all it's home to two airlines, a legacy and an LCC. Like you said, LJU was extremely local and that is it's main problem.

      Anon 10.02

      Cyprus every day? Are you sure?

      Why not? Are you saying the Slovenian government doesn't have better things to spend its money on than a tiny airline that will never become profitable?

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    14. JU520 BEGLAX, the main problem is (was) a bad product in Ljubljana. In terms of convinience, from Koper only Trieste is slightly better than Ljubljana, Venice is quite far away (not to mention the road tolls), from Novo Mesto I have hard time believing that crossing Schengen border is more convinient than going to Ljubljana. But if there is a bad product in place, then of course people will go one extra leg (as do I).

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    15. Nemjee10 October 2019 at 09:33
      aleksandar10 October 2019 at 09:47
      JU520 BEGLAX10 October 2019 at 09:52

      All your statements above are somehow true, but my point at 9.23 was elsewere.

      I was deliberately not talking about airline profitability, different market conditions or future development plans and possibilities, but my question was how do we measure an investment in a national airline ?

      What should/shouldn't be taken in to account ? What improved connectivity brings to a country, besides national pride ?

      I see as positive factors: direct and indirect taxes, improved connections, multiplication effect for suppliers of goods and services, more jobs (direct and indirect), more tourists, more business visitors, ....

      Negative is of course the price, we have to pay for an airline to function.

      But finally, if the result is positive at the end for a country/society as a whole, why not invest 10, 20, 30, 40 even 50 mil. ???

      This analysis is missing in all ex YU countries.

      And please don't mention EU rules preventing it. If you just look at AZ, they are doing it for ages already ...





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    16. I think this would definitely be a smart way to go, the problem I see is that the results might not support what some of the main advocates for new national airline are telling us. For example, I've read a number somewhere in national media, that Adria Airways brought 150.000 turists per year to Slovenia (didn't go into detail checking of the facts). Now remove this number from 5 million turists per year that come to Slovenia, and its hard to see how colapse of Adria would mean the collapse of entire Slovenian turism as people try to sell on TV.

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    17. @Anonym 1155

      If a private investor wants to try his luck, i hve no problem with it. As long tax payers money is not touched. And speaking of who cld be interested I can think only of LO or Air Dolomiti. But lets wait and see :-)

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  2. This could be the best solution for Slovenia in my opinion.

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    Replies
    1. Better than the state establishing an airline.

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  3. Holgar put it quite nicely haha

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    Replies
    1. To be honest he is correct. It's unfortunate they did everything to destroy JP.

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  4. Who could it be? LOT?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Who knows maybe its Lufthansa.

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    2. I would be happy with Air Baltic as a partner :)

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    3. Imagine if it's Croatia Airlines which finally started to react to Adria bankruptcy :D

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    4. ^Yes that would really work out for them financially.

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    5. Could it be Croatia Airlines?

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    6. Doubt it. I don't think people realise OU's financial state. They were just bailed out. The other problem is that they don't have aircraft. In winter their planes go for technical checks, so no chance to deploy the spare capacity elsewhere.

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    7. I doubt "It's too early" Airlines will get involved in this mess. They are trying to stay afloat themselves.

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    8. Croatia Airlines? Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

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    9. It is probably Eurowings and that would make most sence.

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    10. EW is a mess right now, their Austrian operations was just shut down. I doubt they are looking for another adventure.

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  5. 18.6 million loss in 2018 :/

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    Replies
    1. The report is a financial disaster! No wonder they went bankrupt.

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  6. I think if a foreign airline sets up a new Slovenian carrier with 3-4 planes that could work. Cover most important routes needed for Slovenia and that's it. Then maybe in the future expand.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But the most important routes are already being covered by foreign airlines - Lufthansa, Swiss, Brussels Airlines.

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    2. They can be cancelled or discontinued as well.

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  7. If it saves lost jobs and doesn't cost the Slovenian tax payer anything, I'm all for it.

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  8. Too bad we won't be seeing those beautiful Adria uniforms in the sky again.

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  9. Hopefully something comes out of this and the ex Adria staff are not just getting ahead of themselves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If a proposal was already sent to LJU then it is serious.

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  10. Too little too late, The government or employees should have thought of this a month before Adria went bankrupt as was the case with Nordica which started flying the following day after Estonian Air went bankrupt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree. Other airline are already coming in to cover unserved routes.

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    2. True. If they don't hurry up pilots will already find new jobs since they need to renew permits.

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    3. This is correct. Adria's bankruptcy didn't catch anyone by surprise and everyone knew they would go bust. Why didn't the government act in time to secure Slovenia's connectivity?

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  11. This would be fantastic. Hope it happens.

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  12. Some of Adria pilots are just too lazy to go and work abroad and they want the government to provide them with well paying jobs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But this has nothing to do with the government. The company would be privately owned by a foreigner.

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    2. So why do they need the government for then? Open skies, you don't need government approval for routes, LJU has plenty of capacity after Adria's demise, you don't even need a Slovenian AOC.

      A private company can hire Adria's pilots and start flying tomorrow, if they wanted to.

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    3. that were also my reservations when reading this. in the previous days it's always government this government that, now they kind of present a solution with a foreign airline, but yet the government keeps being mentioned in the same sentance. as already said, if it's private capital there is no need for government. so i suspect it's not just private capital, but the need the government to showel some banknotes in their direction.

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    4. @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 09:33:

      Some (mainly you) users are just to lazy to think before posting comments. But that doesn't stop them from doing so.

      No, pilots want YOUR money. Just yours, nobody else's. And they want it now.

      Delete
    5. at Anonymous10 October 2019 at 09:33
      you are just an idiot. Too lazy?

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    6. Company went bankrupt, you have to find a new job. Just like all other people had to, when much much larger companies had the same fate.

      Move on and stop lobbying government to sink more money into projects, destined to fail from the get go.

      Delete
    7. @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 12:41:

      Me thinks finding a company, willing to base aircraft in LJU constitutes as finding a job. So stop barking.

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    8. Sure. Just leave the government and the taxpayers money out of it.

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    9. I sure hope you're putting in so much effort when it comes to overpaid doctors, lawyers, teachers, ...

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    10. Under the Slovenian health and education systems, doctors and teachers are serving everybody, regardless of their financial status.

      What Adria did was get millions of EUR from the government and still sold BRU tickets for 800+ EUR. I bet your average Slovenian travelled a lot with Adria, just as many time as they've been to doctor or school.

      Most of the lawyers, especially the well paid are in the private sector. And they don't go to PM every week demanding the country opens a law office for them. Last time I checked anyway.

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    11. No, but doctors and teachers go. It doesn't matter how many people they serve. The point you (and others) were trying to make was, pilots were overpaid and spoiled. Just like doctors and teachers. But nobody is complaining about them.

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    12. Not overpaid. As long as the government doesn't spend a single EUR to have a national carrier, I don't care if pilots earn 100k/month.

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    13. @Anonymous 11 October 2019 at 05:57 :
      Nice to see you keeping an eye on how your money is being spent.
      Hope you'll be putting in the same amount of effort when doctors go on strike. Again. You know, the guys ans gals who are apparently overworked yet they have time to work another shift during their office hours.

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  13. Very interested to see which airline this is. And whether it's from the EU.

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    Replies
    1. It has to be from the EU, otherwise there will be no EU-EU routes.

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    2. Oh that's correct, forgot about that.

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  14. Which are the most important former Adria routes that need to be covered now?

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    Replies
    1. Vienna for sure.

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    2. According to Ljubljana Airport it's Skopje!!

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    3. ^ Ljubljana Airport said Skopje is important for them to cover in the Balkans, not that it's overall the most important route.

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    4. I agree that Vienna is probably most important and it's a pity Austrian won't be launching it any time soon.

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    5. I hope Wizz Air or Niki cover the route instead.

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    6. c'mom guys...it's totally obvious: the most important route is an additional morning departure for BRU. gotta keep those lazycrat's as*es comfortable.

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    7. Well BRU was the first new route announced after Adria went bankrupt :)

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  15. This would be nice but something tells me it won't materialize.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why? If they already sent proposal?

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    2. Because they want the state to prop up this new airline.

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  16. I bet for Estonian Air (thanks to wunderkid's connections), never ending saga has to continue in LJU couple more years :)))

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    Replies
    1. Sorry, I meant to say Nordica! :)

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    2. Estonian Air went bankrupt 4 years ago but it crossed my mind that it might be Nordica. Adria also owes debt to Nordica. Something over 7 million euros.

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    3. I also think it may be Nordica and the Estonian wunderkid as he is know would become CEO.

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    4. Yes Adria owed 7.8 million EUR to Nordica
      https://www.exyuaviation.com/2019/07/nordica-to-pursue-adria-loan.html

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    5. How ironic that would be. Adria set up Nordica and now Nordica are setting up the new Adria.

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    6. Mujo & Haso: Važno je da se kapital obrće.... :)

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    7. Nordica stops all operation in July (few flights will be operated till end of October). LOT took some of those routes, but most of routes will not be served any more.

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    8. Actually, Nordica as virtual carrier will fly even after end of October - on Gallivare-Arvidjaur-Stockholm line. The actual flying is of course done by its daughter Regional Jet.

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  17. Just let the market take its course.

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    Replies
    1. That's exactly what's happening.

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  18. Fingers crossed.

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  19. There will be a major gap left by Adria's bankruptcy. Hopefully a new airline is established by a foreign company. I don't want the state getting involved.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Judging by popular opinion in Slovenia, I don't think a new state owned airline will be established.

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  20. Why do they need to send proposal to the airport? Are they asking for some sort of concessions a fee waivers?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well they are going to be based there. It is normal to have contact with the airport, ask for slots etc.

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    2. Slots? LJU? That's a nice joke :)

      LJU would take anyone that's willing to fly and pay fees on time. And that was the case even before Adria's bankruptcy.

      LJU was never capacity limited.

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    3. I know bud you have to ask for a slot request at least formally, you can't just randomly land there.

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    4. OK, one email then.

      It's just smokes and screens to convince government to sink even more money into Adria phoenix company.

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    5. Beacuse they expect financial input by Fraport obviously. This can be in different ways, eg. lower fess, additional advertising, etc...

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  21. If this does happen, what do you people think will be the size of the airline and which routes might be launched?

    ReplyDelete
  22. It's not an idea of a private company. Pilots had several meeting with the government, including with the prime minister. They want a new state owned company that will use foreign company AOC and all needed for the virtual new company to fly. Yesterday pilots explicitly stated that they have lots of other opportunities, however there are just "a few good ones". So, basically pilots are try to force the government to establish a new company with working conditions that will suit ex-Adria pilots. It's not about connectivity, not about passengers, it's all about them. If you have listened to them before and after Adria collapse, they never talked about passengers, never had a word of sorry for passengers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a bad option in my opinion. I automatically assumed this would be privately owned company.

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    2. And it's not about profitability. So they say. A new company needs taxpayers' money for their own comfort. The government should be clear: they can have their own company with their own money!

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    3. If they are going to use foreign company AOC, there is little investment required, so pilots could easily fork out the startup cash themselves. But obviously it's better to be on the government titty.

      And as far as the passengers go - typical Adria silver-spoon fed employees. Nobody cares about anybody else in reality, just as long as they get their salaries paid. They were even willing to go on strike a week before the company went bankrupt.

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    4. Yep, this covers the overall feeling of what they expect. Especially the part "they have lots of other opportunities, however there are just "a few good ones"" is a brilliant idea to put on the table when you are negotiating with the government (public funds). How arrogant you must be. Medical doctors at least tell us they have better salaries and conditions elsewhere, when they want more money...

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    5. Anonymous@11:34: I agree. Ultimately, airlines exist because of travelers. The fact that they also provide employment is a welcome side effect, but it's certainly not their raison d'être. Unfortunately, many people in Slovenia believe that the government owes them a job.

      When the country joined the EU, the ability to work anywhere in Europe was one of the biggest selling points, yet many still think that having to move to another country is an unacceptable sacrifice -- never mind that other European professionals routinely move around the continent in search of new opportunities. After all, do we not live in a single EU market?

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    6. Some of Adria's pilots (especially those two showing up on media every day) still think we live in Yugoslavia.

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    7. Pilots are now trying to provoke citizens' emotions after years of travelers' problems with flights and passengers' rights being neglected. They were silent all the time. And yes, they act like the government owes them a job - good enough for them.

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    8. Those are the same pilots that thought that one month ago it was the perfect month to blackmail airline for higher salaries? And now, there is nobody to pay those salaries so they ask government to do it?

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    9. anon 13:05 pretty much nailed it :)

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    10. heard from a friend, who heard from a friend that Laudamotion's offer is 7000 eur gross for captains. You know those "not good enough offers" - let's have some perspective.

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    11. Again, a bunch of pointless comments from ignorant bafoons. Where should we start?

      1. Pilots not caring about passengers. Wrong. Pilots were the ones ALWAYS apologizing for delays and disruptions caused by poor planing by the management. Typical commment coming from a person who never flew with Adria.
      2. Pilots willing to go on strike due to salaries. Wrong. Pilots wanted to go on strike do to roster and poor lifestyle. Again, the poster has no clue.
      3. Obssesion with Yugoslavia. I guess somebody is Yugonostalgic.
      4. Everyone (except non pilots) knows Laudamotion is crap and is only offering jobs to undermine Ryanair pilots and to drive the terms and conditions down.

      So many "aviation experts", yet so little truth to every single post in this thread.

      Delete
    12. I agree that myself and others who are not insiders in the Slovenian or regional aviation business should not comment on the specifics like salaries. However, this doesn't change the fact that we as customer think that Adria services were not satisfying for most of the population (and this was way before it was sold to 4K). That's why we were willing to drive to airports further away. Its not our problem, who is responsible for what inside the company, and how much it costs to operate an airline. Now this does become our problem if someone asks for public money to support such airline, then it is expected that there is a detailed analysis of economic impact and financial plan in place, and not just some generaliations that we hear/read in the news. But if all this is supported exclusively by private funds, the public will continue to stay out and evaluate only the services that are offerred.

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    13. I agree with all of the above. However, there were some comments directed exclusively against the pilots, their salaries and so on. It's no secrets that pilots are viewed as overpaid, underworked button pushers. More so in the eyes of the Slovenes. It's time to stop this once and for all. Every profession deserves respect!

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    14. Absolutely, every profession deserves respect. But in mentality of average Slovenian, who thinks he can tomorrow do a neurosurgery, pilot a plane or manage a company with 1000s of people if he is asked to do it, all high earners will be a target, eventhough the salaries are generally peanuts compared to other Western countries (for full disclosure, I have no clue what an average salary/working condition was in Adria compared to other airlines).

      Delete
    15. Anonymous@16:25: This has nothing to do with the fact that the pilots are high earners. If we were talking about an airline moving into the Slovenian market on a market basis, without any government subsidies, no one would care how much its pilots would make. However, many people are upset because pilots are pressuring the government to spend taxpayers' money on a project whose raison d'être would be to provide employment to a politically influential group -- or so it seems. From some circles, we hear more about what's in the interest of former Adria pilots than what's in the interest of ordinary Slovenian air travelers.

      In fact, I would argue that the situation is exactly the opposite of what you are describing. Laid-off pilots and other influential high earners get a lot more political attention than, say, laid-off blue-collar workers.

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    16. Everyone (except non pilots) knows Laudamotion is crap...

      Is anyone forcing this poor guy to work for Lauda? No? OK then pack your bags and move to other country/continent and find a pilot job there, just like thousands of others.

      Delete
    17. Don't worry about "this poor guy". So by working for Lauda, I can stay in Sovenia?! Good to know they opened a base in LJU. You're such an aviation expert, aren't you?

      Delete
    18. Ok, so Laudamotion is crap....so, were you consider yourself a lucky person working for Adria in a moment that you wanted to go on strike?

      Delete
    19. @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 16:45:

      Of course it's in the interest of Adria's pilots. I would rather keep my family in Slovenia than moving them abroad.

      Delete
    20. @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 17:39:

      Even if we were working for peanuts, we couldn't have saved the company. Have you even seen the latest financial report?!

      So your main problem is the strike? In order to keep people like you happy, pilots should have said they are willing to work for free in order to save the company. Guess what, it wouldn't have helped. Everybody knew that.

      Delete
    21. Anonymous@17:42: But then you shouldn't expect ordinary taxpayers to subsidize your lifestyle preference. Airlines exist because of travelers, not to provide employment -- the latter is merely a welcome side effect.

      Delete
    22. Pilot @17:36

      Unlike some professionals, pilots are citizens of the world and can take their knowledge almost anywhere around the globe. That's an amazing advantage. I went abroad and many others did too. You may gain new experience and one day come back.

      You can also stay if that's your top priority, but then consider career change.

      Delete
    23. Everybody says Laudamotion is crap, but...

      Has Lauda been late paying the salaries? Are they bankrupt or close to bankruptcy? Do they use shady small maintenance providers? Do they operate sh***y old CRJs without carpet in the cabin and 10 HIL items?

      I don't know, seems better than Adria. I could be wrong though.

      Delete
    24. @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 17:48:
      Airlines exist because of travelers?! Doctors have jobs because people want to live longer, policemen have jobs because people want to feel safe, ... What's the point your trying to make?! In that case, every job is merly a welcome side effect.

      @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 17:48:
      Heard that one before. Pilots fly all over the world, therefore they should be happy to live anywhere. Right? And they should feel privileged to be able to drag their families along with them.

      @Anonymous 10 October 2019 at 23:20:
      I'm guessing you're not a pilot. A piece of advice, if every pilot says it's crap, than it must be true. So stop second guessing it. Alright?


      Delete
    25. Look buddy life is not fair. Here's how things work: you don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate. If you manage to negotiate new national airline based at LJU employing locals, good for you! (but bad for taxpayers). If not, it's not the end of the world, you will be able to find other options.

      Delete
    26. I bet Adria's pilots would be applying for Lauda in a second, if they had a base in LJU...

      Delete
    27. Who said anything about life being fair. I'm old enough to know how things in life work. I'm also sick and tired of people worrying about "their" money or bashing and humiliating Adria's pilots. We were working hard, earning decent salaries (for Slovenian standards) and most importantly we were at home. Things have changed and we all know what we have to do. If someone is willing to open a base in Slovenia, so be it.

      But this "fear of uneconomical expenditure of public funds" is becoming annoying and childish at the same time. We all know that the government is throwing money out the window wherever they can. Just to make a profit for themselves. But you will vote for them again.

      @Anonymous 11 October 2019 at 07:43:
      Depending on the offer, but most likely a lot of people would.

      Delete
  23. Slovenian Wand Airlines ?!

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  24. We heard the same stories after Malev demise, on a much larger market. I am afraid Ljubljana will remain regional airport without home based airline. LOT may base an aircraft there, or lowcosters or someone else, but a fully established airline, with all departments, crew, etc... Highly doubtful.

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  25. Aeroflot with 15 SSJ100?
    :-) :-)

    ReplyDelete
  26. When LOT opened BUD base they didn't create a new airline there. There is no legal reason to do so. If their goal is to replicate same approach at LJU they would not need a new airline flying under a new AOC.

    What would be a reason for an EU airline to create a new airline at LJU? That's a red flag.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Direct and indirect state funding? I hope that won't happen, but in Slovenia, you never know.

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    2. I don't think it sounds like a new airline. The article says that they will use their existing AOC. Setting up a local subsidiary in Slovenia would also fit setting up a local base, employing local people. Nothing more advanced than that. Having a local company to help pay local tax etc. My money is on one of the CRJ wetlease operators, like Nordica or CityJet, being this airline, with the intention of flying on behalf of Lufthansa Group from Summer 2020 onwards.

      Delete
    3. Wizz made a base at SKP and BEG without setting up a local subsidiary airline. They use local crew.

      Delete
    4. You misunderstand me. My point is exactly that, that I don't think this is a local airline being set up, just a base for an existing airline. Of course a local subsidiary company (not airline) needs to be registered in each country for administration if nothing else, such as claiming back local VAT.

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  27. I would just like to see healthy competition and not another airline like Adria. As a Star Alliance frequent flyer member, I completely switched from Ljubljana to Trieste more than a year ago. Lufthansa from Trieste was always on time, reliable and with lower prices. When I decided to completely switch between airports most of my flights were around 40 % cheaper. Now, I already have several tickets from Ljubljana till the end of the year due to the fact that there will be reliable airlines with tickets that are priced very similar to those from Trieste. When it comes to Lufthansa Group Airlines, Adria more or less created disorder in Ljubljana, forcing us to use alternative airports.

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    Replies
    1. +1 I also switched to Trieste because of price and reliable comnections. Now I will definitely look back to Ljubljana if the price resembles the one for Trieste.

      Delete
  28. ---
    Anonymous10 October 2019 at 15:20
    Again, a bunch of pointless comments from ignorant bafoons. Where should we start?

    1. Pilots not caring about passengers. Wrong. Pilots were the ones ALWAYS apologizing for delays and disruptions caused by poor planing by the management/.../
    ---
    Totally agree with pilots apologizing, but I'm not so sure if Mr kowarsch himself did route planning.

    Yes management makes decisions, but there is more than 500 people to provide inputs so decisons can be made.
    Or I am wrong and everyone was just nodding with their heads and saying yes to crap proposals from obiously noncompetent 4k?

    ReplyDelete
  29. And what happens to those that have purchased tickets with Adria airways for next year? Just lost money? Who to trust anymore?

    ReplyDelete
  30. For this winter season (from 27h October 2019 till 29th March 2020): Lufthansa will suspend Trieste - Frankfurt so can put the capacity on the route to Ljubljana. It was told officially that is that way because Adria Airways bankrupted.

    ReplyDelete

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