Croatia Airlines suspends coastal flights


Croatia Airlines has suspended international flights from airports in Split, Dubrovnik and Rijeka as a result of the coronavirus Covid-19 outbreak. The decision affects services from Split to Frankfurt and Munich, as well as Rome, which was suspended earlier on. From Dubrovnik, the airline will no longer fly to Frankfurt and services have been suspended between Rijeka and Munich. Affected passengers on all of the aforementioned flights will be transferred to Zagreb in order to complete their journey. Furthermore, the airline has begun cancelling a select number of services out of the Croatian capital. So far, this only includes flights to Vienna on certain dates. The carrier previously suspended flights to the Italian capital until April 3.

Croatia Airiness acknowledged it has seen a slowdown in bookings and overall demand. As a result, the company is currently discussing postponing the launch of its new services from Zagreb to Podgorica and Sofia, which were due to commence at the start of May. The carrier further noted that other ad-hoc changes to its timetable were possible. Croatia Airlines has introduced a more flexible travel policy for all international passengers. The policy refers to existing and newly booked tickets up to March 31, 2020. Passengers are entitled to a date change with the rebooking fee waived.

All foreign nationals entering Croatia, having visited France, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, Germany (except Heinsberg county in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia), Austria, Great Britain, Netherlands, China (except Hubei province), Republic of Korea (except Daegu city and Cheongdo province), Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Bahrein and Slovenia (Bela Krajina area) over the past two weeks will be subject to compulsory fourteen-day self-imposed isolation. Entry of foreign nationals having visited Italy, Iran, Hubei province in China, Daegu city and Cheongdo province in Korea and Heinsberg county in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany will be subject to compulsory fourteen-day quarantine at their own expense.




Comments

  1. Anonymous09:05

    :(

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous09:05

    This is all going from bad to worse.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous09:07

    This will hit us all really hard, unfortunately! Hope next year will be better!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous18:43

      2021 will be our year :D

      Delete
  4. Anonymous09:07

    Can OU survive this? It's not like the government can injection money into them.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:14

      EU (and other) governments will probably have to inject money in national carriers, suppose Croatia will do the same!

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:16

      Let's hope so though I think this will be a weak summer season which won't be good for our economy.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:30

      Lufthansa is just in discussions with the government about government help to sustain its ops. Delta announced the grounding of 300 planes. This will be a big hit for the world economy and states will all have to save airlines. For that the EU has already announced the relaxation of the rules that govern the subsidies.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous10:07

      Anon@9.14am - if the Govt had to inject money when times were good and the state of aviation was positive and other airlines were making money, it goes without saying that they will need to do so when things go bad as is happening now. So the taps can never been turned off as far as OU is concerned.

      All it reinforces, is how commercially unviable OU is ..... this would be a good time to let things take their natural course.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous10:21

      And let them go bankrupt, really?

      Delete
    6. Anonymous12:34

      EU announced they will allow more state interventions in this period.

      Delete
    7. Anonymous17:53

      While I hope that the government will inject funds into OU in the future people have to remember that the government needs to have the funds. A lot of businesses will be requesting money from the state. There is only so much the state can do.

      Delete
  5. Anonymous09:08

    Honestly, what did you expect?

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:14

      Sorry, what did who expect?

      Delete
    2. Anonymous17:54

      Yes, I don't think people were expecting a network expansion during this crisis.

      Delete
  6. Anonymous09:12

    OU will probably ground whole fleet next week. I would say it is smart move since planes are really empty and making even more loss flying like that. Hopefully situation will get better soon.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:21

      We have domestic flights as well, why stopping them?

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:23

      Because no one is flying right now, that's the problem.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:30

      Sorry, not true, less people fly, and there are many of them going to hospitals or work from Dubrovnik (where I live) to Zagreb. Suppose from Split to Zagreb, as well.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous09:41

      That's not healthy demand at all.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous09:46

      I'm really sorry that you don't understand, Anon 09:41.

      Delete
    6. Anonymous10:10

      there will be domestic flights for sure, dont worry about that..and of course OU and all other regional airlines will get additional goverment fnancial aid, this is unprecedented situation

      Delete
  7. Anonymous09:56

    OU will be saved by the government, don't worry about that. British Airways will need a bailout also. It's the likes of easyJet and Ryanair who are going to be in serious trouble from this crisis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:09

      Norwegian is most at risk - it will take a Houdini act for them to get through this crisis

      Delete
    2. Anonymous17:51

      Yes, Norwegian was doing poorly even before the crisis. The only good news is that the Norwegian government has reacted and cut all state imposed taxes on all airlines.

      Delete
  8. Anonymous10:38

    I'm not going to try and say that this virus is no biggie but I believe the reaction and hysteria is disproportionate.

    The number of people infected proportionate to the population of each country is extremely low. I recommend everyone to research 2009 Swine Flu epidemic. Look at the numbers of infected in each country. The figure is staggering (that includes our ex-yu microstates). Far more infected and dead in Italy, Spain 11 yrs ago than today. Yet aviation continued.

    I'm not prone to conspiracies but the economic carnage of this will be MUCH worse than the virus and will affect everyone, unlike the virus which is affecting less than 1% of national populations. It makes you think if it is in someone's interest for the global economy to tank. Stoking constant fear in people by counting every single infected person with screaming headlines and governments gauging people's reaction via social media and acting accordingly will never end well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous11:33

      The number of cases is low because the testing is low and most people stay at home/self-isolate and are not tested.
      The problem with the current pandemic is that its mortality and percentage of cases that require hospitalisation is far greater than that of the Swine flu, over 10% of all cases. Hence the shutdowns and lockdowns, if it spreads even more, the health systems of countries will begin to collapse and they will have to begin to choose who to save and who to just let die. Do you really think China would have quarantined tens of millions of people over something trivial and unimportant?

      Delete
    2. Anonymous12:36

      Last anonymus +1000

      Delete
    3. World markets were well over due for a correction. History told us it would happen in 2018/19 but we had very bullish word markets throughout 2019 bucking the trend. However, with the underlining economies off all those countries being weak, the Corona outbreak was the excuse needed to trigger major selling but we also had the crash of oil last weekend so a double shock to world economies. This has never really happened before, not even during the GFC.

      Now we have a health and a financial crises brewing and I think overreacting and panicking wont help.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous17:55

      I agree Q400. I only think that the pain of the financial crisis will be much more widely felt and much more painful than the current health crisis.

      Delete
  9. Anonymous11:04

    +1000

    ReplyDelete
  10. Zagreb airport even before coronavirus felt empty, now you must hear crickets!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous17:54

      Probably in this situation is better feel safe than to go hunting for numbers. Seems like everything is measured in pax. Quality and safety are important too.

      Delete
  11. Anonymous17:49

    Disappointing news.

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  12. Anonymous17:50

    Imagine how light the loads are if they are able to combine passengers from all the coastal airports onto the Zagreb flight.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous17:52

      It's same for all airlines around the world.

      Delete
  13. Anonymous17:50

    Are domestic flights continuing?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous17:52

    I wonder if we will see more cancellations from Zagreb? A few flights to Vienna doesn't seem much at the moment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous17:56

      I assume so. I doubt they are flying full planes.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous18:00

      With countries banning entry for people from so many other European countries, it is becoming pointless for airlines to even fly.

      Delete
  15. Anonymous17:56

    In some good news in these bleak times, the number of new cases in China is now in single digits and most of them are from abroad. Also Chinese airlines are starting to resume international flights from March 27 which is a good sign. Also, for what it is worth, no new cases in Northern Italian zone which was first quarantined.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous18:44

      Let's hope in a week or so there will be better news from Europe too.

      Delete
  16. Anonymous17:57

    I think TGD and SOF will be cancelled for this year, as well as two additional planes. The Air Nostrum wet lease might stay for summer but even that's a strech.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous18:42

      Actually I believe that in the aftermath of this crisis it is regional routes that will recover first. So I hope they don't cancel them. Maybe postpone them by a month.

      Delete
  17. Anonymous18:42

    Hope all employees at ex-Yu airlines and airports stay strong.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Anonymous18:43

    What a disaster this year will be. The start of the summer season is ruined as well as the Easter period. Shame :(

    ReplyDelete
  19. Anonymous19:34

    Interesantno spasava ih drzavni proracun ,a oni ukidaju i ono malo sta lete za obalu. Gospodo pa promijenite ime umjesto Croatia airlines u Zagreb airlines , al neka vas onda samo Zagreb spasava.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous19:49

      Ne znam da li vidis sta se desava u svetu avijacije. Sta drugo da urade???

      Delete

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