Air Serbia sells Boeing aircraft


Air Serbia has sold two of its Boeing 737-300 aircraft to an undisclosed buyer in China. The two were removed from the carrier’s fleet in January and February of this year respectively. The jets, registered YU-ANK and YU-ANI, are both 35 years old. YU-ANK made the journey from Belgrade to Nanchang via Ufa and Irkutsk in Russia yesterday, while YU-ANI is still grounded in Belgrade. According to the TangoSix portal, a third B737-300, registered YU-AND, which has been out of service since February 2020, will be eventually put on display at the Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade.

The phase out of the Boeing 737s from the national airline’s fleet was planned by the end of this year. However, the two aircraft had fewer cycles left in them and due to an overall reduction in flight operations, the carrier decided to remove them earlier than planned. The decision was also made in line with the company’s goals to reduce its fleet’s greenhouse gas emissions and make savings in maintenance, training and the means required to keep an aircraft of over thirty years in operation. “Keeping in mind the forecast for the industry made by relevant institutions such as Eurocontrol, the Airbus and ATR fleet will be sufficient for the operation of scheduled and charter flights in the medium-term, while the company will continue to be proactive and respond to changes on the market”, Air Serbia said earlier this year.

Both aircraft were delivered new to JAT Yugoslav Airlines and later operated for Jat Airways and then for Air Serbia under the carrier’s dedicated charter brand Aviolet. The jets were also leased out to various foreign carriers, primarily during the 1990s and early 2000s. YU-ANI held the record for being the oldest Boeing 737-300 series aircraft in regular commercial service (excluding cargo and military VIP configuration versions). In 2018, Air Serbia put a number of non-airworthy general aviation aircraft on sale, the last of which flew in 2013. In total, nineteen aircraft were put on the market, including thirteen Cessna 172 Skyhawks, three Cessna 152s and three Piper Cheyennes. Some of the aircraft were out of service since 1992.



Comments

  1. Anonymous09:01

    I can't believe someone was actually interested in them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous23:19

      And that they actually don't want to cut it up in pieces.

      Delete
  2. Anonymous09:01

    I wonder how much money they got, if any

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:02

      Even if they got peanuts, it's more than one could expect.

      Delete
  3. Anonymous09:02

    Good news for Air Serbia.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous09:03

    It's good they managed to get something for these fossils but it raises the question about their own fleet renewal. The current fleet will be unable to satisfy their needs next summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. JATBEGMEL11:53

      Is there no available aircraft on the market for JU to lease?

      Delete
    2. Anonymous23:20

      Well it's time to think are short-term leases sufficient or should they think long term and actually buy an aircraft.

      Delete
    3. JATBEGMEL01:21

      A brand new fleet would cost over a billion euros, without including extras for expansion. Additional frames for expansion takes the total over 2 billion euros - roughly half the current estimated price of the Belgrade Metro project or 3.7% of Serbia's GDP.

      For now, short term leases are more than sufficient until the airline can stabilise its finances.

      Delete
  5. Anonymous09:04

    It was about time to sell them finally. What was the price?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous23:21

      We will probably see in JU's 2021 financial report next year.

      Delete
  6. Anonymous09:06

    Will they be used for spare parts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:07

      There is an aircraft engine academy in Nanchang that was recently established, so it might be related to that.

      Delete
    2. Avionlet09:19

      I heard that they are going to a pilot academy, but I can’t be 100% sure about that.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous23:21

      Interesting. Whatever it is, it's good to see it will continue to live :)

      Delete
  7. Anonymous09:08

    Sad they didn't get a proper send off.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:37

      True that.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:37

      Air Serbia doesn't care about such things.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:48

      Given the history of these aircraft, they absolutely should have organised a farewell flight.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous09:49

      @9.37 not surprising since it is being run by people who have no connection to the country or the company's history. This is just another stop in their CV and in a couple of years they will move onto another airline.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous09:50

      ^ It's not up to the CEO or CCO to organize farewell flights or come up with these ideas. There is a marketing department at JU. But they don't care either.

      Delete
    6. Anonymous09:52

      If Dane were around I'm sure they would have made something. For all his faults he did actually make some mention of the company's history and heritage. They did have those stickers on planes with all the former logos for their anniversary a few years ago.

      Delete
    7. Anonymous10:10

      Anon 09:32 agreed. At least Dane respected the JAT legacy, unlike the new guys. We are coming up to the centennial for Aeroput. Air Canada painted the livery of one of their planes to match the original legacy livery paying tribute to the airline’s heritage.

      Delete
    8. Anonymous10:27

      Current Air Serbia is a new airline and has people with no historical background of Serbia or Yugoslavia. All respectful airlines will organise a special, farewell ceremony as a sign of gratitude like what Lufti did with its 747 classics for instance. What a shame and especially on Naysmith and Marek.

      Delete
    9. Anonymous11:35

      You can't expect foreign management to understand or even feel anything for the "Serbian" sentiment or history. Where was the Chairman or the other Board members, all of whom are Serbian and appointed by the Govt ? That is their job. You should be asking them why they didn't direct the foreign management to do something about this ....

      Delete
    10. Anonymous11:38

      Anonymous @ 10.27 - with Naysmith leaving, it might present the Govt with the first opportunity to appoint someone with no prior Etihad history who might be more dedicated and committed to JU and Serbia

      Delete
  8. Anonymous09:08

    About time

    ReplyDelete
  9. Anonymous09:08

    sad to see them go.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Anonymous09:09

    The ATRs must also go ASAP.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:11

      The regional fleet should indeed be their number one priority now.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:11

      There are rumors they will be getting ATRs next year and one A330.

      Delete
  11. Anonymous09:12

    Considering the money poured into JU they should really think about fleet renewal. Shame those neos got cancelled.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:16

      The neos would have been a disaster to have in the fleet now.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous13:32

      @09:12 what are you talking about?!? other than charter and TIV they (JU) are not able to fill 60% of a A319 not to mention any larger bird. Their load factor on most European routes is in the 50%.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous13:33

      Their load factor has been well above EU avarage all of this year. Don't talk rubbish.

      Delete
    4. JATBEGMEL13:59

      Over a billion euros is needed to replace each aircraft with brand new aircraft, without considering any fleet expansion. JU has had problems stabilising its finances the past 3 decades to turn a profit. Factory fresh aircraft for JU currently would be a financial disaster for the company.

      If you meant leased aircraft, the past 3 years saw 3 A319's join the fleet and YU-ARA was replaced with YU-ARB. The average age of the jet fleet has dropped over 50%, especially since the B733's were retired. The fleet currently is decent, ATR's need replacing, but it is clear that this is what they indend to do.

      @13,33

      Just because their CLF is above European average it doesn't mean much. It's still not ideal for all airlines.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous13:59

      Money "pouring" in has gone to cover the loss making operation as well as the Etihad Partners bondholders. It leaves nothing for fleet renewal

      Delete
  12. Anonymous09:15

    What is Aviolet gonna use from now on?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:16

      What they used this summer and increasingly in previous seasons - the A319/A320.

      Delete
    2. JATBEGMEL17:27

      Aviolet was a brand made to distance the Air Serbia brand from the B733's.

      JU doesn't need a dedicated brand for charters. It just complicates things. The B733's were used as well on scheduled flights and A319's on charters. What benefit does JU have on keeping the Aviolet brand? Whats the point of a dedicated brand for 3 months of peak summer traffic? Should they paint aircraft in the Aviolet brand and operate them for charters only, which means for 9 months most aircraft don't fly? Is Air Serbia not allowed to operate charter flights?

      Delete
    3. Smirite vašu histeriju pobogu. Aviolet je ugašen kad su povučeni B733

      Delete
  13. Anonymous09:18

    End of an era

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous09:19

    What happens with the pilots that were flying to B737?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:21

      None of the JU pilots no longer have valid licenses for 737s. Even a few years ago it was becoming a problem finding pilots as most had retired from JU and Air Serbia was using an agency to hire pilots. That's why on occasion you would get pilots from Croatia operating your Aviolet flight.

      Delete
  15. Dovidjenja Cipiripiji! Odradili ste svoje posteno! Hvala vam! I da parafraziram jednu staru izreku : Bilo je casno zivjeti sa vama! 😃Stariji ce razumjeti, a mladjima, uz najbolju volju, tesko da mogu objasniti.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous13:28

      +100 za nas malo starije koji jos pamtimo! ...

      Delete
    2. Anonymous16:06

      Bravo Rodni Marinković.

      Delete
    3. @An.16.06
      Nisam siguran da gospodin Rodney dijeli moje stavove o JAT-u i bivsoj drzavi pa bas i ne mogu povuci paralelu, ali ok, svatko ima pravo na misljenje i stav

      Delete
  16. Anonymous09:26

    Those ancient 737s were being worked more than ever during Covid in 2020. Farewell old ladies.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Anonymous09:26

    Can't understand why they retired the planes that have still left hours on them instead of flying them until the hours expire?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Anonymous09:27

    I just don't get where they are going to place the 737 at the museum. The Museum courtyard is full.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:27

      It is supposed to be expanded.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:31

      I hope they restore it into JU "egg" (actually globe) B737 livery.

      Delete
  19. Anonymous09:27

    :(

    ReplyDelete
  20. Anonymous09:28

    Maybe they should have converted them to cargo. DHL just upgraded Belgrade from B734 to B752 and SilkWay has been a regular visitor these days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:31

      That would involve lots of investment and more money spent.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:33

      Yes but it would bring extra revenue and profits.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:48

      Is the DHL still from Budapest or Leipzig?

      Delete
    4. Anonymous10:42

      It’s now from Milano.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous12:13

      Converting a 35-year old 737 to freighter is pointless. ROI would be negative, as the aircraft would probably be retired way before it'd pay off the conversion costs.

      Look at Amazon, they are flying newly converted 737-800 freighters from the early 2000s. How competitive do you think a 35+ year old 737-300 could be?

      Delete
  21. Anonymous09:32

    Sad to see them go but it was time.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Anonymous09:33

    Congratulations on actually selling them. More than I could expect.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Anonymous09:33

    What happened to those general aviation aircraft put on sale in 2018? Did they manage to sell them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous23:24

      Some were sold, some were scraped.

      Delete
  24. Anonymous09:35

    Ok it is obvious now that Air Serbia will need to get more aircraft. Obviously they don't need them at the moment but inext summer I think they will have to expand their fleet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:35

      *next

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:38

      Vucic is meeting Putin in Russia in two weeks. I just hope they don't formalize Sukhois.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:44

      I highly doubt it. The story is the government asked if JU wanted these planes and JU declined.

      Delete
    4. Anonymous09:47

      It seems Belavia is now interested in SSJ100.

      Let them test these planes and not JU.

      Delete
    5. Anonymous09:51

      Considering the sanctions, there is not much else they can be interested in unfortunately.

      Delete
  25. Anonymous09:40

    Quite a transformation. From Boeing being the dominant member of the fleet 7 years ago to none left.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous09:43

      In my opinion ATRs should also be phased out sooner rather than later.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous09:47

      I do not think so. They just need to replace older ones with younger and more comfortable versions

      Delete
    3. Anonymous09:47

      The ATRs are literally falling apart.

      Delete
    4. U pravu ste Anon 09:40.
      Boeing je temelj komercijalne avijacije.
      Bio i ostao. Bice veoma zahvalno ako se B733 - AND iz bivse flote Boingovih aviona,
      Nadje stalno izlozen u buducem parku izmedju drugih pet, sest vazduhoplova. Koji su saobracali iz Beograda. Zanimljivo je da je AND i
      ANJ avioni koji su imali najduze letove od svih B733 kojima je kompanija raspolagala, zakljucno sa Er Srbijom. Ova dva aviona su sa medju sletanjem letela do Sidneja. Gde sam ih svakodnevno vidjao nekoliko meseci. Leteli su na lokalnim linijama nekoliko meseci. Veoma mi je milo bilo kada sam na Sidnejskom aerodromu cesto vidjao ih. Ukljucujuci i DC10- 30 koji su doletali dva puta nedeljno iz Beograda. Za kolege sa kojima sam tada radio u Qantas-u,
      Bio je to praznik, zadovoljstvo gledati malu Srpsku flotu na petom kontinentu.
      Sve ima kraj. Ali i pocetak. Verujem da ce Er Srbija u buduce imati posebne servise za kargo, carter, carter i pitnicki servis. Nisam siguran da cu vidjati Er Srbiju u Sidneju. Ali kada sam u Srbiji, tu je Beograd, Nis, Kraljevo, Ponikve...
      Dok je Srbije bice i aviona. A Radovana?
      Da leti dok je ziv. And beyond...
      Ko nema vere, nema ni dana za njega...
      Rodney Marinkovic and Aviation Enthusiast Associate Group. 🇷🇸✈🌐🛫🇦🇺✈

      Delete
  26. Anonymous09:55

    It's nice to hear that they will save one of the B737s. They deserve it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:00

      Nothing is certain until we see it in front of the museum. Don't trust JU with anything.

      Delete
  27. Anonymous09:57

    A positive out of this is that Air Serbia's average fleet age has now come drastically down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:00

      ATRs are old and are weighing them down but Airbus fleet is now okay. Latest additions are only 10 years old.

      Delete
  28. Anonymous10:01

    Timeless classic :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Anonymous10:01

    Turned out these B733 were just fantastic, really sad they are now history. But I hope they don't cut them up in China.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Anonymous10:04

    If ever there was a type of plane that has been fully exploited by an airline then it was this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:09

      They served their company well :)

      Delete
  31. Does anyone know if a319 YU-APJ is on maintenance or it's going to leave the fleet? Thanks a lot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:23

      I believe it is leaving the fleet.

      Delete
  32. Anonymous10:22

    Air Serbia seriously needs to start thinking about what it is going to do with its fleet. They just don't seem to have any strategy at the moment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:24

      How so? Their strategy is Airbus for jet and ATR for regional. The regional one might be replaced with another type in the future.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous11:06

      ^ And what is their strategy for acquiring new aircraft?

      Delete
    3. JATBEGMEL16:42

      It's obvious that their strategy regarding their fleet has been leasing more aircraft for growth. Their finances are horrible for purchasing factory fresh aircraft, so the only option is to lease.

      If you put just a little thought into it and read the articles here you would see this.

      Delete
  33. Anonymous10:42

    It is interesting that YU-ANK passed C check and had enough resources for this summer season and probably the most of next. ANI had less cycles available but still enough for this summer. So it still stays doubt why JU grounded this aircrafts and then wet leased Smartwings. Anyway 737 stays in a nice memory with a certain dose of regret that no farewell flight was performed. But maybe we expect to much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous10:50

      I guess they did not foresee there would would have the good demand they did this summer.

      Delete
    2. JATBEGMEL16:46

      1) larger than anticipated demand this summer.

      2) pilots and cabin crew need to have recurrent sessions each year to maintain their licenses. Probably wasn't worth the investment for the 3 peak months.

      Delete
  34. Anonymous11:16

    What happened to YU-ANL and YU-ANW?
    According planespotters they are just stored

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous13:00

      I think they were used for spare parts and are cut up in pieces.

      Delete
  35. Aviolet is also phased out as a brand. Their webpage now redirects to aiserbia.com

    JU 737 retirement means end to an era for aviation enthusiasts. It was bound to happen.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Anonymous13:00

    I wonder what the JU fleet will look like in the next 5-6 years?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous13:25

      I am afraid that it will not be pretty as already overhead panels in A319 are hanging, seats are broken, armrests without coussion parts...etc. I can only image that ATR shape is even worst. Seems like nobody cares about the appearance of the cabins as long as the plane has valid cycles it is deemed ok.

      Delete
    2. Anonymous13:36

      Stop talking absolute nonsense and rubbish. I fly with JU 10 per year and have yet to witness fallen panels and broken seats. It is one thing to hate but making things up while never having set foot on their plane is a whole new level.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous17:06

      Mr 13:36 you better check out the picture from last Sunday FRA- BEG flight report snd see the shape of the seat. APD has a broken pannel in row 16 hanging from the ceiling. Sorry I don't hate and I am not making things up, I am just realistic with the fact that JU cabins are deplorable and nothing to be proud of.

      Delete
    4. JATBEGMEL17:08

      @13,25

      Cabin maintenance is not the greatest in JU but not the worst. Its a stupid comment to make. I've seen bad cabin maintenance in airlines such as OS and EK to name a couple. OS on their B767's had screens that were inoperative for months, I've seen water leaking from the galley on the EK A380 spreading to a few rows during take off and landing, just to start the list.

      If only you knew what some pax do on the aircraft would shock you. Chewing gum on seats and seat pockets, punching IFE screens, removing lavatory doors, urinating in the cabin, parents letting children draw on the cabin walls...it's a very looooong list.

      Delete
  37. I hope the 737 will actually end up in the museum and not rot away at the airport graveyard for the next decade like the JU 727 destined for the museum too.

    Does anyone know what's happened to that 727 and another Convair which were supposed to be hauled a few years back?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous14:37

      Apparently there is no way to transfer 727 and 737 sized aircraft to the Museum proper. In one piece that is. Looks like it will be easier to get those planes to the outdoor area on the other side of C concourse extension, as seen on plans for the future.

      Proper course of action would be for City of Belgrade to build new civil aviation hangar behind the Museum, cut wings off 727, 737 and CV-440 and get them over to the new hangar, put them together, restore them and keep them inside.



      Delete

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